Barriere (B.C.)

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Barriere (B.C.)

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Barriere (B.C.)

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Barriere (B.C.)

7 Archival description results for Barriere (B.C.)

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Oswald Kofler interview

CALL NUMBER: T3880:0007 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Life of the Austrian immigrant Oswald Kofler RECORDED: Victoria (B.C.), 1983-03
SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Austrian background; Alps, Carinthia; trains; tourists; tourists in the 1930s; life of the population; description of village; father was a wagon maker; Emperor Franz Joseph; Tauern Railway between Carinthia and Salzburg; schooling for seven years; children had to learn to work early, starting at the age of ten during the summer vacation, September and October; left home in 1914; sleeping in the barn; eating in the kitchen and doing homework on that table; life of the Kofler family; mother sick; girls hired out; three sisters; life after finishing school; Russian prisoners of war; to; another farmer after WWI; then construction work; Sundays off; sheepherder in the Alps; lumber work in the winter; herding cows the second summer; training for mountains in BC; job in hotel in Baadgastein (silver polisher); guests from all over the world; hotel job only seasonal; could have made a career of hotel work in Austria; discovery of Canada; advertising of Red Star Line in Austria for farm workers; trip from Cherbourg to Quebec City. TRACK 2: Reaction of village; Red Star Line's admission procedures; financing $200 for trip; seven shillings for a dollar; transportation to Canada; Quebec City; eating and sleeping on the train; Winnipeg; Edmonton; first job at Stony Plain; second job at Preisecker, southeast of Calgary; to Barriere BC to cut railroad ties; people in BC; like a village in the Austrian Alps; buying land; building a log house in 1932; car in 1937; animals; exemption from war service because of the farm; wartime, enemy alien; breakdown; shingle mill; asthma; selling everything; origin of asthma was cedar poisoning; English language; Eaton's catalogue; German newspaper, 'Canada Kurier"; new life in Vancouver, starting with an Austrian friend; sacking potatoes; sciatica.;
ALL NUMBER: T3880:0008 RECORDED: Victoria (B.C.), 1983-03 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: The need for lighter work; night clerk in Prince Rupert; in 1951, was a cook on a fish packing boat; night watchman in a pulp mill; larger fish packer; Queen Charlotte Islands; sunk by a large freighter; everyone rescued; decision to visit Austria; trip there; relatives and friends; stories exchanged; German language; European countries after WWII; Netherlands and Austria compared; back in Prince Rupert; further contact with relatives through letters; new job with the Canadian Coast Guard; chief steward until 1959; steward on "Camsell", a Coast Guard icebreaker; view from the ship; mirages, etc.

Webster! : 1982-02-22

Public affairs. Jack Webster's popular weekday morning talk show. Guests and topics for this episode are: Peter Gregerson and James Penton are ex-Jehovah's Witness members who talk about the lies and deceit they saw within the top levels of the Jehovah's Witnesses organization. Bernard Robinson, Commissioner of Corrections in BC, and Peter Whelan, program analyst in the Corrections Branch, explain how a proposed criminal law will affect juvenile law offenders. Webster questions John Evans, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance, about some of the items in Canada's new budget.

Adeline Genier interview

RECORDED: [location unknown], 1964-06-29 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Mrs. Adeline Genier came to BC from Ontario in 1892; she describes her trip out west; her husband was Gilbert Genier, an electrician who got work from Sturgeon Falls to Vancouver working for the CPR. She was married in Kamloops in 1892 after her bout with mountain fever. The power house was built in Kamloops at this time. She mentions several people who worked on the power house and what was involved in learning how it worked. Her husband ran the power house for seven years until the family moved to Heffley Creek to buy a ranch. When the Klondike rush began they opened a stopping house for the two pack trains which came through; eventually sold it and the ranch and built a school at Heffley Creek. She is the mother of nine and she talks about how successful her life was. She describes the people and ranches at Heffley Creek and her family's values. She discusses recreation such as baseball. They moved to Barriere and she tells the story of how the town was named. TRACK 2: She describes Louis Creek and how it was named; the reserve and the roads going to and from the town. The Indians and how good neighbours they are. Anecdotes about Indians; how the children grew up with music; more anecdotes.