Item A-06122 - Quatseeno [Quatsino] Indian Village, Vancouver Island. This is the best part of the country for obtaining flat head skulls. Indians squatting down out [of] their ranches. Drying stands in the foreground for fish, berries etc. Quatseeno Indian Village, Quatseeno Sound on the west coast of Vancouver Island. The Indian skulls at this village are greatly deformed by flattening during infancy....

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Quatseeno [Quatsino] Indian Village, Vancouver Island. This is the best part of the country for obtaining flat head skulls. Indians squatting down out [of] their ranches. Drying stands in the foreground for fish, berries etc. Quatseeno Indian Village, Quatseeno Sound on the west coast of Vancouver Island. The Indian skulls at this village are greatly deformed by flattening during infancy....

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  • Continuation of title: ...The Quatseeno Indian Village in Quatseeno Sound on the north west coast of Vancouver Island at which place the mode of flattening the skull is carried out to perfection one girl had her head so flattened that it appeared conical and half as high again as it ought to have done; as far as I know the mothers only flatten the skulls of their daughters as it is the fashion, commencing soon after the child is born, it is placed in a basket, or bark cradle and a splint of wood is held down with thongs over the head of the infant having a pad of pulled soft cedar bark which is placed on the forehead of the child and held there for the first year or eighteen months, or as long as the child remains in the cradle, it does not appear to imp[air] the mental faculties of the adult in the least, as they are as susceptable [sic] of pride, vanity, insult or injury - as keen at bargaining or trading as any indians I have ever met with - and in quarreling should one squaw say to another that her mother was too lazy to flatten her skull when a baby - nothing scarcely annoys or offends more than that. The mode of building the lodges is different to that of the southern or eastern tribes of indians living on the island, their food consists principally of fish whic[h] they have in abundance, but deer, elk, grouse, ducks, berries and roots are also plentiful, the indians are stout, healthy and strong of a dark tan color. F. Dally.

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A-06122

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  • 1866 - 1870 (Creation)
    Creator
    Dally, Frederick, 1838-1914

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1 mounted albumen print, 27 x 29.5 cm.

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(1840-1914)

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Frederick Dally was born in Wellingborough, Northamptonshire, England in 1840. He arrived in Victoria, British Columbia, in 1862, on the China Clipper “Cyclone.” In March 1864, Dally leased a store at the corner of Fort and Government streets, and in 1866 he opened a photographic studio in Victoria. Between 1865 and 1870, he took extensive photographs around Vancouver Island and in the Cariboo District.

In 1866 Dally accompanied Governor A.E. Kennedy on H.M.S. Scout for a tour of Vancouver Island and Nootka Sound with his primary purpose being to visit and photograph First Nations communities.

In 1867, Dally visited the Cariboo goldfields in the central interior of British Columbia, and opened for business in Barkerville. He remained here for one month before returning to Victoria after a brief stay in Quesnelmouth. He returned to the Cariboo and again set up shop in Barkerville the following summer. His studio was in operation for only two weeks before it was destroyed by the Barkerville fire on September 16, 1868. During his stays in the Cariboo, Dally photographed mines, towns, and scenery. By December of the same year, Dally had returned to Victoria and was again operating his studio on Fort Street.

In 1870, Dally’s business was taken over by the Green Brothers, who were meant to purchase Dally’s negatives and photography equipment. Two years later, these items went for sale at auction and many of Dally’s negatives were purchased by Richard and Hannah Maynard. Many of Dally’s photographs were published for sale under the Maynard name.

In October of 1870, Frederick Dally travelled to Philadelphia where he enrolled in a dentistry program. He graduated in 1872, at which point he returned to England to practice dentistry.

Frederick Dally died in 1914.

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Archives code(s): HP016128

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Accession number(s): 198611-001
Located in Container 001111-0001, Folder 20

Bears tag "Lot 42"

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