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British Columbia. Forest Service British Columbia. Forest Branch
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Forest Service launch log books

  • GR-0053
  • Series
  • 1922-1952

The series consists of 32 volumes of log books of Forest Service launches, created by the Forest Branch between 1922 and 1945 and the Forest Service between 1945 and 1952.

British Columbia. Forest Service

Scaler's licenses and receipt book

  • GR-0940
  • Series
  • 1913-1954

This series consists of Scalers' licences, Nos. 1-3000; and receipt book.

British Columbia. Forest Branch

Correspondence and other material relating to scaling

  • GR-1226
  • Series
  • 1912-1976

This series contains miscellaneous records relating to scaling, including correspondence of the Assistant Supervisor of Scaling, receipts and a ledger for scalers' license fees and lists of licensed scalers.

British Columbia. Forest Branch

Hearing records regarding tree farm licenses

  • GR-1241
  • Series
  • 1959

This series contains a transcript of a hearing before the Minister of Lands and Forests regarding the application of Canadian Forest Products for a tree farm licence in the Nimpkish River region.

British Columbia. Forest Service

Forest Service scale and royalty invoices

  • GR-3180
  • Series
  • 1912-1975

The series consists of scale and royalty invoices created by the Forest Branch and its successor the Forest Service between 1912 and 1975. Depending upon the district, these records are either duplicate or triplicate copies. For some districts, invoices were to be paid at the Victoria Office, for others at the appropriate district office.

The records are arranged by forest district, and then numerically by account number. Records are available for the following forest districts: Vancouver, January 1913 to August 1976; Cariboo, September 1972 to November 1974, Nelson, April 1925 to February 1975, Williams Lake (also known as Cariboo), January 1913 to January 1932; Kamloops, February 1913 to March 1975; Vernon, February 1913 to March 1925; Cranbrook, October 1912 to March 1925; Prince Rupert, April 1913 to October 1974; and Prince George, March 1914 to June 1952. Account numbers are assigned chronologically within each forest district. However, when numbers became too large and unwieldy the account numbers were started over again at one.

The province collects royalties on all logs cut in the province. Over time the royalties owing have been calculated in different ways. Prior to 1894, each licensee or leasee provided a monthly written account to government of the number of trees cut on a particular property. This count was referred to as "stumpage" and fees were based on the numbers remitted. In 1894, the enactment of the Official Scaler's Act (SBC 1894, c. 35) resulted in the appointment of official scalers. Scalers followed scaling rules to measure the volume of logs cut and were usually employed by the provincial government. Scalers also determined the species and quality, or grade, of the logs. This information was then used to determine royalties owing to government.

Three scales were accepted for use in the province: British Columbia Board Foot Log Scale (BCFBM), Scribner's Decimal C and Doyle Log Rules. In 1915, only the British Columbia Board Foot Log Scale as accepted (Timber Royalty Act, SBC 1914, c. 76, s. 17). This scale estimated the amount of lumber that could be produced from a log, in board feet. The Forest Act (SBC, 1912 c. 17) provides the legal authority for the government's administration of scaling and requires that all logs be scaled before manufacture or shipment. The act is also used as the authority to determine which is the accepted scale. In 1946, the British Columbia Cubic Scale was introduced. This scale measured the volume of the log in cubic feet that might be ~suitable~ for the manufacture of lumber. In 1952, all measurements had to be done using the cubic scale.

A significant change occurred in 1965 when the BC Firmwood Scale Cubic Scale was adopted. This scale measured the net firmwood content of the log and was unrelated to its use for lumber. The purpose of this scale was to serve the government's requirements to assess fees and track the volume of harvests for statistical use and planning. By 1972, all other scales were discontinued. In 1978, a metric cubic scale replaced the imperial cubic scale. There are two primary methods of scaling used in the Province: piece scale and weight scale. Piece scale involves the measurement of each log harvested. This method is normally used in coastal areas where the logs are larger and not uniform in size. Weight scale is a sampling method where selected loads of logs over a period of time are piece scaled and this data is then used to estimate the volume of all other weighed loads. This method is used primarily in the interior of the Province and was introduced in 1963. It is used primarily for large volumes of smaller logs that are uniform in size. Other scaling methods may be used for small volumes of special products, for example, Christmas trees or fence posts.

British Columbia. Dept. of Lands

Forest Service district invoices

  • GR-3181
  • Series
  • Microfilmed 1953 (originally created 1914-1952)

The series consists of invoices for building rentals, timber mark hammer purchases, and other items for forest districts handled by the central records office of the Forest Branch and later the Forest Service in Victoria. Records are arranged by forest district and then by invoice number. Invoices numbers are assigned chronologically. The records include: Kamloops (number 1 to 400, 1921-1931); Victoria (number 1 to 4400, 1914-1951); Vernon (number 1 to 155, 1921-1925); Cranbrook (number 1 to 39, 1921-1926); Nelson (number 1 to 2399, 1921-1951); Prince George (number 1 to 1300, 1921-1926); Prince Rupert (number 1 to 2800, 1918-1951), Williams Lake (number 1 to 81, 1920-1932) and Vancouver (numbers 1001 to 2000 and 4001 to 16442, 1929-1952).

British Columbia. Forest Branch

Forest Service photographs

  • GR-3426
  • Series
  • 1911-1984

The series consists of photographic negatives, prints, and transparencies created by the Ministry of Forests and its predecessors including the Forest Service and Forest Branch. Series documents forest service personnel and activities relating to forest planning, protection and inventory; engineering; rangelands management and use; recreation resource management and use; research; and timber harvesting. Subjects often relate to specific forest districts, and include trees and other botanical specimens (specific species and their characteristics), stands and forests, aircraft and watercraft, buildings and facilities (such as mills, nurseries and laboratories), employees, equipment and tools, experimental projects, forest fires and fire control, geographic features (such as mountains and rivers), logging practices, pests and diseases, railways and roads, tree planting, wildlife, and vehicles. Records' arrangement based on original Forest Service numbers. These numbers reflect some arrangement by subject matter. The records include Forest Service numbers: FS00001 - FS25983.

The photographs are arranged numerically by FS number. The photo prints are mounted on cards which contain the title, the Oxford Forest classification number, the Forest Service photo number, the photographer's name and the date the photo was taken. The negatives are arranged numerically. The negatives have been removed from the original glassine negative envelopes which often have notes written on them.

The series also consists of various lists and indexes of Forest Service photographs.

British Columbia. Forest Service

Forest Service personnel photographs

  • GR-3437
  • Series
  • 1913-1982

The series consists of Forest Service personnel photographic prints and negatives created by the British Columbia Forest Service between 1913 and 1982. The photographs are arranged alphabetically by the last name of the employee. The photo prints are mounted on cards which contain the title, the Oxford Forest classification number, the Forest Service photo number, the photographer's name and the date the photo was taken. The negatives are arranged alphabetically. The negatives have been removed from the original glassine negative envelopes which often have notes written on them.

The series also consists of a list of photographs of Forest Service personnel.

British Columbia. Forest Service