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Bennett, W.A.C. (William Andrew Cecil), 1900-1979 British Columbia--Politics and government--1952-1972
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The good life

The item is a release print of a promotional film from 1968. It shows the economic and other benefits enjoyed by BC residents as a result of political leadership and industrial development in the province. Includes sequences on primary and secondary industries; the damming of the Columbia and Peace Rivers for hydro-electric power and flood control; expansion of highways; BC Ferries; tourism; assistance to homeowners; medical services; educational facilities; etc. Premier W.A.C. Bennett makes some brief prepared remarks at the film's beginning and end.

The good life : [out-takes]

Out-takes. The economic and other benefits enjoyed by BC residents as a result of political leadership and industrial development in the province. Includes sequences on primary and secondary industries; the damming of the Columbia and Peace Rivers for hydro-electric power and flood control; expansion of highways; BC Ferries; tourism; assistance to homeowners; medical services; educational facilities; etc. Premier W.A.C. Bennett makes some brief prepared remarks at the beginning and end of the film.

W.A.C. Bennett interview : [Mitchell, 1976-1978 : part 1]

CALL NUMBER: T1675:0013 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): The early years and family background of W.A.C. Bennett, 1900-1930 PERIOD COVERED: 1900-1930 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1976-05-12 SUMMARY: W.A.C. Bennett discusses his early years, the background of his family in New Brunswick, family relationships and early education. First interest in politics. Recollections of political figures. Apprenticeship in the hardware business. Moving to Edmonton after the First World War. Religious and business activities in Edmonton. Attitudes towards tobacco and alcohol. Meeting his future wife, Annie Elizabeth May Richards. Moving to British Columbia, 1930. CALL NUMBER: T1675:0014 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): British Columbia politics from the 1930s to the Second World War PERIOD COVERED: 1930-1939 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1976-10-08 SUMMARY: W.A.C. Bennett discusses British Columbia politics during the 1930s and comments on the personalities and political styles of Premiers Simon Fraser Tolmie and T.D. Pattullo. W.A.C. Bennett recounts his first involvement in provincial politics as a Conservative. Elected in 1941 in South Okanagan. Pattullo and the Rowell-Sirois Commission. Reasons why Pattullo was "turned out" by his own party. Formation of the coalition. Social Credit and economics during the Depression in the 1930s. CALL NUMBER: T1675:0015 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): W.A.C. Bennett and Coalition politics in B.C., 1941-1951 PERIOD COVERED: 1941-1951 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1976-10-08 SUMMARY: W.A.C. Bennett discusses his service as an MLA on the Post-War Rehabilitation Council. The effect of Pat Maitland's death on the Coalition government. Bennett comments on his increasing disillusionment with the Coalition government which precipitated his crossing of the floor of the House in 1951. The 1948 Yale by-election. Bennett recollects his first attempt to enter politics in 1937. The origins of the single transferable ballot. Socialism and Social Credit. CALL NUMBER: T1675:0016 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): W.A.C. Bennett recalls the political battles of 1952 and 1975 PERIOD COVERED: 1952-1975 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1976-12-13 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: W.A.C. Bennett recalls his response to the criticisms which were levelled at him after joining the Social Credit party. Attitudes towards the press. Comments on Tilly Rolston and the importance of her defection from the ranks of the Coalition government and decision to join Social Credit. The relationship between the Alberta Social Credit party and the fledgling Socred movement in B.C. Events surrounding Bennett's decision to join Social Credit. TRACK 2: Comments on the Social Credit convention of December 1951 and Bennett's decision not to run for the campaign leadership of the party. The meeting after the 1952 election at the Hotel Vancouver at which W.A.C. Bennett was chosen as leader of the Social Credit party. The 1952 election campaign. The importance of hospital insurance as an issue in the campaign. Anecdote about a campaign meeting at Golden where Bennett was confronted by Liberal hecklers led by Tom King. Religion and its importance in Social Credit election victories. Grace McCarthy, Dan Campbell and the rebuilding of the Social Credit party after the 1972 election defeat. CALL NUMBER: T1675:0017 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): W.A.C. Bennett and Social Credit's rise to power in B.C., 1952 PERIOD COVERED: 1952-1972 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1976-12-13 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: W.A.C. Bennett recalls further aspects of the 1952 election campaign. Albertan Socreds in the election campaign. Political organization in the 1952 campaign. Waiting to be called upon to form a government. The role of leadership in politics. Lieutenant-Governor Clarence Wallace and the constitutional problem posed by the outcome of the election. Bennett assembles his prospective ministers in Victoria and prepares to assume office. Meeting with Clarence Wallace. Swearing in the new government. Tom Uphill's mistake. TRACK 2: Comments on the problem within Socred ranks after forming government. Social Credit was one coalition replacing another. Government and patronage. The importance of Bennett in the Socred victory. The role of the single transferable ballot. The Socreds were a "people's government". Economic development in British Columbia since 1952: the Columbia River Treaty, the two-rivers policy, the genesis of the homeowners' grant and parity bonds. CALL NUMBER: T1675:0018 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): W.A.C. Bennett and the consolidation of power, 1952 PERIOD COVERED: 1950-1952 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-01-15 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: W.A.C. Bennett discusses the decline of the Coalition government in B.C. Reform elements within the Coalition. The Esquimalt by-election of 1951. Commander A.C. Wurtele and his reluctance to ;run as an independent candidate. The Esquimalt by-election campaign. The importance of the by-election. TRACK 2: W.A.C. Bennett discusses joining the Social Credit party. The influence of Eric Martin. The financial state of British Columbia's government at the time he assumed office, August 1952. Advice given to cabinet colleagues. Problems associated with acquiring legislative seats for Robert Bonner and Einar Gunderson. Relations with the provincial civil service after forming the government. CALL NUMBER: T1675:0019 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): W.A.C. Bennett and the Socreds' first session in the B.C. Legislature, 1953 PERIOD COVERED: 1952-1953 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-01-15 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: W.A.C. Bennett discusses problems he encountered after forming B.C.'s first Social Credit government, August, 1952. Problems within the Social Credit party. Relations with opposition parties in the House. The appeal of Social Credit. Einar Gunderson and his role in government. Robert Sommers and the Doukhobor issue. Meeting with Premier Manning in Edmonton, December 1952. Comments on the first session of the B.C. legislature presided over by a Socred administration, 1953. TRACK 2: Choosing a Speaker of the Legislative Assembly. Coordination of House strategy with the Socred caucus. Initiation of pay-as-you-go policies for government expenditures. Harold Winch as Leader of the Opposition. The defeat of the Socred government in the House on the Rolston Formula. Preparation for defeat. Events following the defeat of the government in the House. CALL NUMBER: T1675:0020 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): W.A.C. Bennett and the 1953 provincial election PERIOD COVERED: 1952-1953 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-01-15 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: W.A.C. Bennett discusses the effect of not being called upon to form a government on Harold Winch. The provincial election campaign, 1953. The effect of the transferable ballot. Relations with the federal Social Credit party. Support of Real Caouette for the leadership of the federal party. Reasons for success in the 1953 election. Preference for use of the title "Prime Minister". Effects of becoming Premier on personal life. [TRACK 2: blank.]

W.A.C. Bennett interview : [Mitchell, 1976-1978 : part 3]

CALL NUMBER: T1675:0030 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): The 'Five-Regions' idea and Canada's future RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-11-06 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: W.A.C. Bennett discusses the origin and background of the five-regions concept. Recollection of the federal-provincial conference on the constitution, 1969, when Bennett first publicly advocated the idea. Reaction to the five-regions idea. Comments on how each region of Canada would benefit if Canada was restructured according to Bennett's plan. The Canadian north and the five-regions plan. The five-regions idea and the decentralization of the Canadian federal system. TRACK 2: Comments on Brian Brown's book, "The New Confederation". Bennett's views on British Columbia's place within Canadian confederation and the trend towards North American continentalism. Political alliances versus economic common markets. Bennett values Canadian independence and British political institutions. Anecdote about Rene Levesque asking Bennett to lead British Columbia out of Canadian confederation. CALL NUMBER: T1675:0031 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): British Columbia politics and the BCR (part 1) RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-11-14 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: W.A.C. Bennett discusses his involvement with service clubs. His fierce patriotism for British Columbia. Cooperation with the federal government on several projects. Medicare. Construction of; the Trans-Canada Highway in B.C. The genesis of Roberts Bank. Cost-sharing with the federal government. Bennett's submission to the Royal Commission investigating the British Columbia Railway (BCR). Criticism of the post-1972 administration of BCR. TRACK 2: The BCR as a political railway. Reasons for changing its name from PGE to BCR. The intention to sell the PGE by some early B.C. Socreds. The railway should be operated as a public enterprise for the benefit of private businesses in the province. The railway should be run like a business. The role of Joe Broadbent, the manager of the BCR. The role of the president and board of directors of the railway. The issue of under-estimating construction costs on the Dease Lake extension of the BCR. Reasons for the extension of the BCR into the Canadian north and through to Alaska. Bennett's attitude towards environmentalism. CALL NUMBER: T1675:0032 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): British Columbia politics and the BCR (part 2) RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-11-14 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: W.A.C. Bennett discusses the future of the BCR. The current plight of the railway is due to mismanagement by the NDP during the years it formed the provincial government. Bennett describes how, in his view, it would be possible to rejuvenate the BCR and prepare it for great future development. [TRACK 2: blank.] CALL NUMBER: T1675:0033 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Government pension funds and labour policies, 1952-1972 PERIOD COVERED: 1952-1972 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-11-15 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: W.A.C. Bennett discusses his government's use of public service pension funds. The issue of pension fund shortfalls. Bennett's method of securing the future value of pension funds. The indexing of pensions. The problem of inflation and its effect on pension funds. The issue of pension fund socialism. TRACK 2: W.A.C. Bennett discusses the labour policies of his government, 1952-1972. The role of organized labour in the B.C. economy. Theory of labour-management relations. The character of the labour movement in B.C. The effect of government policies in labour-management relations. The NDP and organized labour. The issue of strikes in essential services. Evaluation of Bennett's Ministers of Labour: Lyle Wicks, Leslie Peterson, James Chabot. The government as referee in labour-manage;ment relations. CALL NUMBER: T1675:0034 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Personal nicknames and Saltspring Island hideaway RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-11-25 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: W.A.C. Bennett discusses his relationship with close personal friends. Commencement of the use of the initials W.A.C. after moving to Kelowna, 1930. Origin of the nickname "Wacky". Bennett's hideaway on Saltspring Island. Spending weekends on Saltspring Island while Premier. Description of Saltspring cottage. [TRACK 2: blank.] CALL NUMBER: T1675:0035 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): The budgetary process, treasury board and cabinet PERIOD COVERED: 1952-1972 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1978-02-04 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: W.A.C. Bennett discusses playing cards with friends and the importance of relaxation. Anecdote about a story told at a Christmas family occasion by Bennett's son R.J. Description of the budgetary processes of Bennett's government. TRACK 2: The role and function of little treasury board. The process of treasury board. Bennett's role as Chairman of the treasury board. The effect of Bennett's style of budgeting on his government's policies. The budget as an instrument of government policy. Serving simultaneously as Premier and Minister of Finance. The operation of Bennett's cabinet. The; virtual absence of cabinet committees. Travelling cabinet meetings. Plebiscites. CALL NUMBER: T1675:0036 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Wenner-Gren and plans for the development of British Columbia PERIOD COVERED: 1952-1978 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1978-02-11 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: W.A.C. Bennett discusses maintenance of the legislative precinct during the period he was Premier. British Columbia's development and the growing world economy during the years of his government. The background to the Wenner-Gren plan to develop the interior of the province. Bennett's meeting in London, England, with Sir Andrew McTaggart and Dal Grauer which presaged the takeover of the B.C. Electric Company. TRACK 2: The genesis of the two rivers policy. The development of hydro-electric power on the Peace River and its effect on negotiations for the Columbia River Treaty. The effect of the Wenner-Gren plan. The memorandum of intent which was signed between the government and the Wenner-Gren B.C. Development Corporation. The aborted plans for the Pacific Northern Railway. The role of Einar Gunderson in the Wenner-Gren plan. Bennett responds to charges that BCR losses were hidden during the years of his government. CALL NUMBER: T1675:0037 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Education policies of the Social Credit government, 1952-1972 PERIOD COVERED: 1952-1972 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1978-02-14 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: W.A.C. Bennett discusses his attitudes towards higher education. Anecdote about persuading his son, Bill, to consider going to university. Construction of Simon Fraser University and the University of Victoria. Relations with UBC. Relations with the academic community in general. Government funding for education. TRACK 2: Bennett recalls addressing a large student audience at UBC at which the university president, Norman McKenzie, was heckled. Evaluation of Bennett's successive Ministers of Education: Tilly Rolston, Robert Bonner, Ray Williston, Leslie Peterson, Donald Brothers. Dual cabinet portfolios. The role of the teachers in the defeat of the Social Credit government, 1972. Anecdote about Bert Price voting against the Socred minority government, 1953. CALL NUMBER: T1675:0038 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Relationship with John Diefenbaker and the federal Conservative Party PERIOD COVERED: 1948-1963 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1978-03-04 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: W.A.C. Bennett recalls the days when he was a Conservative in British Columbia and memories of John Diefenbaker. The 1948 Yale by-election. Reasons for lack of success in the by-election. Efforts by the federal Conservatives to have Social Credit join their party. Relationship with the Diefenbaker government. The Columbia River Treaty. Meeting President Kennedy at a banquet in Seattle. The 1963 provincial election campaign and Davie Fulton's challenge in British Columbia. TRACK 2: Reasons for Fulton's challenge to Social Credit in British Columbia. Factors contributing to Fulton's failure in the 1963 election. Diefenbaker and the opening of the Trans-Canada highway in British Columbia. W.A.C. Bennett as a British Columbia nationalist.

Dan Campbell interview

CALL NUMBER: T3717:0001 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Early years in politics, 1956-1960 PERIOD COVERED: 1926-1960 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1980 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Dan Campbell discusses his personal and family background. Education and military experience. Pursuit of a teaching career. Supported the C.C.F. as a young man. Moved to Courtenay in 1950 and taught school. Served as president of the local teachers' association. First impressions of Social Credit. Meeting W.A.C. Bennett, 1953. Decision to run as a Social Credit candidate in the 1956 election. Recollection of the 1956 election campaign. Memories of election night. Comments on the Comox constituency. Orientation as a new MLA and maiden speech in the Legislature. Anecdote about W.A.C. Bennett being too hard on Bob Strachan. Recollection of Strachan as Leader of Opposition. First impressions of caucus. Voted against the government on one occasion. The role of caucus. TRACK 2: Reflections on the Sommers affair. Attitude of the Socred caucus toward the Sommers case. Sommers' weaknesses. Campbell complemented his income as an MLA by part-time teaching. Attitude towards labour and organized labour in B.C. Right-to-work proposals. Labour and politics. Ambitions as an MLA. The role of an MLA. The 1960 provincial election and the issue of the take-over of the B.C. Electric Company. The reasons for the take-over. W.A.C. Bennett's methods of discipline over party ranks. Interests and service on committees as an MLA. CALL NUMBER: T3717:0002 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Cabinet minister in the government of W.A.C. Bennett PERIOD COVERED: 1960-1966 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1980 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Dan Campbell discusses the Columbia River Treaty and the Two River Policy, and how they were understood by members of caucus. Appointment to cabinet as Minister of Municipal Affairs, 1964. Reasons for his appointment. Effect of becoming a cabinet minister. Relationship with ministerial staff. Policy-making and government. Daily duties as Minister of Municipal Affairs. Conditions in the ministry at the time he took it over. Re-organization and expansion of the ministry. The image of the government as an anti-metropolitan administration. The creation of instant towns on Vancouver Island. The genesis of regional districts. The organization of regional districts. Arguments against regional districts. Appointment as Minister of Social Welfare, 1966. Reasons for the appointment. Comments on dual-portfolio ministers. Comments on bringing the three female members of the Socred caucus into cabinet as ministers without portfolio. TRACK 2: The role of a minister without portfolio. Ways decisions in government were made. W.A.C. Bennett was not a one-man government. The experience of guiding estimates through the House as minister. Campbell enjoyed getting the Opposition excited. The process of Treasury Board. Appearing before the Treasury Board. W.A.C. Bennett as Minister of Finance. Special committees of cabinet. Legislative reform. Attitude towards instituting a daily question ;period and Hansard in the House. The misuse of legislative committees. Comparison between W.A.C. Bennett's style of government and "modern" government. W.A.C. Bennett as environmentalist. W.A.C. Bennett's influence on Campbell's political style. CALL NUMBER: T3717:0003 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Aspects of politics and government, 1960-1972 PERIOD COVERED: 1966-1972 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1980 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Dan Campbell discusses the organization of the Social Credit Party and its relationship with the government during the years when W.A.C. Bennett was Premier. The role of an annual party convention. Relationship between the provincial and federal wings of the Social Credit Party. Campbell opposed a convention resolution that would have separated coterminous membership in the provincial and federal branches of the Socred Party. Comments on the dream of Socred success at the federal level in the early '60s. Recollection of the contest for the leadership of the federal Social Credit Party between Real Caouette and Robert Thompson. Reasons for the federal party's failure. Religion and politics. Bennett as a man of the cloth. Anecdote about lawyers. Social Credit and populism and anti-intellectualism. Relations with the press. Federal-provincial relations when he was a Minister of the Crown. Attending federal-provincial conferences with Bennett. Attitude towards such conferences. Main issues as Minister of Social Welfare. Comments on Phil Gaglardi being brought back into the cabinet in 1969 as Minister of Social Welfare. Loyalty as a weakness of Bennett's. Campbell threatened to resign over the Gaglardi affair. TRACK 2: Dan Campbell as a champion of native rights in B.C. and service as Chairman of the First Citizens' Fund. The effect of Robert Bonner's resignation from the ;cabinet, 1968. Bonner's role in Bennett's government. Administering the Job Opportunities Program and friction with Gaglardi. Reasons why Campbell received responsibility for the program. Further comments on Gaglardi and reasons for tension between him and Campbell. Gaglardi would not have won a leadership contest in the party. The question of succession to the leadership of the Social Credit Party after Bennett. Attitude toward the Opposition and the Opposition leaders he served against. Objections to socialism. Polarization and coalition politics in B.C. The 1972 travelling cabinet tour. CALL NUMBER: T3717:0004 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): B.C. politics, 1972-1975 PERIOD COVERED: 1972-1979 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1980 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Dan Campbell discusses the 1972 provincial election campaign. Differences between the campaign and previous elections. The ban on advertising of liquor and tobacco as a factor in the election. Comments on Comox constituency. Gaglardi's indiscretions and their effect on the outcome of the election. Election night in Comox. Reaction to the election and personal plans immediately afterwards. Serving with W.A.C. Bennett as an administrative assistant after the election. W.A.C. Bennett's strengths and weaknesses. Reasons why W.A.C. Bennett asked him and Grace McCarthy to help rebuild and party after the 1972 election. Comments on the plan to rebuild the party. Different roles played in the rebuilding process. The legislative arm of the Social Credit Party after the 1972 election. Asking the MLAs to sign statements of allegiance to Social Credit. Comments on the efforts to form an alternative free enterprise coalition to Social Credit: the majority movement or unity party. The goals; of the majority movement. Comments on W.A.C. Bennett dissuading backers of the majority movement from their efforts. Travelling with W.A.C. Bennett and Grace McCarthy throughout the province, reorganizing and revitalizing the Social Credit Party. Factors in the great interest which was shown in the party after the 1972 election. Recollection of "Uncle Bill" Dale. TRACK 2: Continuation of recollection of "Uncle Bill" Dale. Criticisms of NDP government 1972-1975. Comments on Bill Bennett and how he got elected in 1975. Robert Bonner and the majority movement. Social Credit as the only possible vehicle for uniting the free enterprise forces in British Columbia. W.A.C. Bennett and Bill Bennett. General comments and comparison between the government under W.A.C. Bennett and Bill Bennett. (End of interview)

Hon. Tilly Rolston : copy of radio speech, Feb-1953

Radio speech made a week after the opening of the 1st session of the 23rd B.C. Legislature [03-Feb-1953], Education Minister Tilly Rolston (Social Credit MLA for Vancouver-Point Grey) discusses t;he recent political history of B.C., the results of the June 1952 election, W.A.C. Bennett, and Social Credit policies with regard to school financing, taxes, automobile license fees, hospital insuran;ce, the economy, natural resources, parks, highways, tourism, freight rates, inequalities faced by women, etc.;

Bill Bennett interview : [Mitchell, 1978]

SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): From the father unto the son: the political education of Bill Bennett PERIOD COVERED: 1930-1952 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1978-01-06 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Premier Bill Bennett discusses growing up in Kelowna during the 1930s. Relationship with his brother and sister. Social life and education. The Bennett household. W.A.C. Bennett as a father. The role of his mother. Religion and the Bennett family. The effect of politics on the Bennett family. Relations within the family. Recollections of the Bennett home and surrounding grounds. Education. Attending private school. The decision to enter the family business on a full-time basis. TRACK 2: Premier Bill Bennett discusses the question of when he personally attained adulthood. Visiting the Penthouse cabaret in Vancouver in the early 1950s. Young adulthood as the son of the Premier. The reasons why he did not drink alcoholic beverages as a young man. Reading habits as a boy. Reaction to his father joining the Social Credit Party, 1951. Reaction to his father becoming Premier, 1952. Working for his father during election campaigns. Taking over the family hardware business with his brother. The argumentative nature of the relationships between members of the Bennett family. Politics and public service. (End of interview)

Kenneth Kiernan interview : [Reimer, 1977]

CALL NUMBER: T2665:0001 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Personal background and the Great Depression PERIOD COVERED: 1916-1937 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-07-04 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Born in 1916 in the Peace River country of Alberta. Details about Kiernan's family and homesteading. Father killed in WW I; mother remarries and they continue to farm. Left Peace River country in 1927. After several stops, settled on a farm at Sumas Prairie. More details about Kiernan's family. Tough economic conditions in the Peace River district. Kiernan's education and work history to 1935. Ends formal education after grade 8. Reading habits as a young man. TRACK 2: Took correspondence courses from the Canadian Legion. Leisure activities as a youth: Trail Rangers and basketball. Delivered newspapers in Chilliwack area. "Rode the rods" to the Prairies in 1935. Economic struggles of Alberta and Saskatchewan, 1935-37. Returned to B.C. on the rods in October 1937. Anecdotes about riding the rods. CALL NUMBER: T2665:0002 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Life during the 1930s Depression and World War II PERIOD COVERED: 1935-1948 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-07-04 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Continuation of anecdote about riding the rods, 1935-37. Marginal economic circumstances of the Kiernan family during the Depression. Worked in Fraser Valley mills. Contracted pneumonia. Worked for Eddy's Nurseries, 1937-40. Joined the New Westminster Regiment, 1940. Interested in Social Credit in Alberta, 1935-37, but not a member. Read works of Marx but rejected them in the 1930s. Critique of Marx and of Canadian economic system in the 1930s. TRACK 2: Kiernan in motorized corps in Canada, 1940-46. Eventually became a Warrant Officer II. Not able to go overseas because of previous pneumonia. Comments on military discipline. Kiernan into business as a garage operator near Chilliwack, 1946. Flooded out in 1948. CALL NUMBER: T2665:0003 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): The Fraser River flood of 1948 and the 1952 provincial election PERIOD COVERED: 1948-1952 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-07-06 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Kiernan describes his experiences in being flooded out during the 1948 flood of Fraser River. Description of his return to the flooded home and service station. Becomes president of local PTA in 1950. Joined Social Credit in 1951. Comments on the Coalition government. Comments on Coalition/Liberal Premier Boss Johnson and Conservative leader Herbert Anscomb. TRACK 2: Kiernan becomes very active as a Social Credit organizer, 1951-52. Kiernan takes 1952 Social Credit nomination. Organizational details about Social Credit in Chilliwack. Early meetings emphasized monetary reform. The "Christian image" of Social Credit. The importance of individualism in Social Credit. General discussion of political philosophy. Liberals and Conservatives unaware of the upsurge of Social Credit in Chilliwack. Circumstances under which Kiernan took 1952 nomination. Defeated sitting Conservative Leslie Eyres. Key roles of Alberta Socreds in 1952 election. CALL NUMBER: T2665:0004 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Social Credit comes to power : 1952 election PERIOD COVERED: 1952-1972 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-07-06 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: The importance of W.A.C. Bennett in the 1952 election. Kiernan says Alberta influence was minimal ca. 1952. 1952 Social Credit convention. Ernest Hansell as 1952 campaign leader. Bennett disillusioned with Conservatives. Kiernan sometimes "scared" by the vision of W.A.C. Bennett in things such as the two-river policy. Kiernan gives a sample of his 1952 election style. TRACK 2: Kiernan's experiences as a public speaker. The hard work of political campaigning. Description of Social Credit cabinet meetings. Kiernan's recollections of election night in 1952. Kiernan went to visit Bennett in Kelowna shortly after 1952 election. The decision is made to have W.A.C. Bennett as political leader, July 1952. CALL NUMBER: T2665:0005 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): British Columbia's first Social Credit government, 1952 PERIOD COVERED: 1952-1956 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-07-06 & 1977-09-13 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Kiernan is selected to be Agriculture Minister in the first Social Credit government. Anecdotes about becoming government. Comments on the Bennett style of leadership. The formation of the first cabinet. Kiernan speculates on the reasons for his selection as Minister of Agriculture. Comments on communist scare tactics used against the C.C.F. Socialist economic planning inappropriate for B.C. Problems with the dairy industry were the first big problems faced by Kiernan in the Agriculture portfolio. TRACK 2: The transition to power: early cabinet meetings, help from senior civil servants. Cabinet procedures. The selection of Robert Bonner and Einar Gunderson. Rev. H.D. Francis and Orr Newton resign in order to provide seats. Kiernan downplays the notion that the senior civil service opposed the new government. The firing of Percy Richards. Hospital insurance reforms after the 1952 election. Alternatives to hospital insurance proposed. CALL NUMBER: T2665:0006 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Minister of Agriculture PERIOD COVERED: 1952-1956 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-09-13 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Facing the problem of hospital insurance after the 1952 election. Building the cabinet team, 1952-53. Discussion of the 1953 session of the Legislature. Socreds maneuvering for defeat? Bennett sure of dissolution? The legislative defeat of Social Credit and the unusual passage of bills prior to dissolution. The "atmosphere" in the House at the time of the 1953 defeat. The resignation of Harold Winch as C.C.F. leader. The 1953 election. TRACK 2: Discussion of the 1953 election continued. The defeat of Tilly Rolston and Einar Gunderson. Their importance as cabinet ministers. Gunderson as a member of the Treasury Board. The election of John Perdue as president of the Social Credit League. Issues within the Department of Agriculture: brucellosis control, irrigation, hay shortages. Comments on W.H. Robertson and William McGillivray as Kiernan's deputy ministers. CALL NUMBER: T2665:0007 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): The Sommers affair PERIOD COVERED: 1952-1958 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-09-13 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Kiernan gives background to the Sommers affair. Comments on Gordon Gibson Sr. The "money talks" speech, February 1955. Gibson's charges not substantiated by the Lord Commission. Gibson's charges treated with great skepticism. Kiernan did not see the RCMP report to the Attorney-General's Department. The government has private investigator investigate the charges against Sommers. Sommers a known gambler to Kiernan. TRACK 2: More on Sommers' gambling. No pressure from ministers on Bennett to fire Sommers. Sommers called on to account for the allegations by cabinet and caucus. Sommers consistent in his denials. Circumstances surrounding the resignation of Bonner. Kiernan becomes Minister of Mines. CALL NUMBER: T2665:0008 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): The Sommers case and Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources, 1956-1964 PERIOD COVERED: 1953-1964 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-09-26 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Death of Tilly Rolston, 1953. Discussion of Sommers case, continued. Opposition to Forest Management Licences. Sommers' resignation and Kiernan takes over the Mines portfolio, 1956. Robert Bonner and delays in the case. Comments on Mel Bryan who crossed the floor on the Sommers case. More on the delays. Sommers case harms Social Credit government. Kiernan expresses doubts about the guilt and illegal intentions of Sommers. Case did not affect timing of 1956 election. Not aware of Sommers' cabinet contact. TRACK 2: No suggestion of impropriety by Sommers in the Mines portfolio. Gifts to cabinet ministers. Sommers investigated by private detective. Kiernan's general observations on the Sommers case. "Politics is war". Kiernan Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources, 1956-64. The challenge of taking over a new portfolio. Comments on Deputy Ministers of Mines: John Walker, P.J. Mulcahy. The framing of new petroleum legislation. Comments on the B.C. petroleum and gas industry.; CALL NUMBER: T2665:0009 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Minister of Mines and Petroleum Resources, 1956-1964 PERIOD COVERED: 1945-1964 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-09-26 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: The development of oil and natural gas leasing systems. Development of the Peace River region. The building of Westcoast Transmission pipeline. Description of Frank McMahon. Comments on foreign ownership of petroleum and natural gas resources. Description of the auction of oil and natural gas leases. TRACK 2: The auction system continued. Frank McMahon in the 1960 election. Anecdotes about some B.C. mining executives: Ozzie McDonald, Spud Huestis, Mel O'Brien. The opening of Bethlehem Copper Corporation mine in the Highland Valley. Changes in mining taxation and land tenure systems, c. 1957. Problems of establishing an iron and steel industry in B.C. Vehement industry opposition to changes in mining legislation. CALL NUMBER: T2665:0010 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Mines and Petroleum Resources, and Recreation and Conservation, 1956-1972 PERIOD COVERED: 1956-1972 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-09-26 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Major problems faced as mines minister: taxation legislation, departmental expansion, mine safety. Dispute with federal government over offshore mineral rights. "Political" decision by the Supreme Court of Canada on this issue. The reclamation of mining sites. Kiernan expresses his opposition to the idea of company towns. Taxation on profits vs. royalties in the mining industry. Kiernan concerned about "penny mines" on the Vancouver Stock Exchange. TRACK 2: The formation of the Department of Recreation and Conservation, 1957. Kiernan becomes Minister of Recreation and Conservation, 1963. Anomalies in the classification of provincial parks. Mineral claims and timber leases in provincial parks. The case of Western Mines in Strathcona Park. The role of pressure groups in the Buttle Lake controversy. Preparation for his new portfolio of Recreation and Conservation. General comments on park development in B.C.; CALL NUMBER: T2665:0011 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Minister of Recreation and Conservation PERIOD COVERED: 1964-1972 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-09-27 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Skepticism about the idea of wilderness preservation. The illogic of some park boundaries. The changing of the boundary of Manning Park to facilitate mining. Kiernan's ideas on the multiple use concept. Kiernan's impressions of the B.C. Wildlife Federation, SPEC, Sierra Club. The role of the Sierra Club in the boundary determinations for Pacific Rim National Park. TRACK 2: More on the Sierra Club of B.C. W.A.C. Bennett's attitudes on park matters. Public access on forestry roads. The formation of the Environment and Land Use Committee (ELUC) in 1969. Comments on the operation of ELUC and the Secretariat. ELUC originally a problem-solver rather than policy-maker. Comments on a few specific issues dealt with by ELUC. Kiernan not convinced of the concept of a single Minister of the Environment. Williston as chairman of ELUC. Land use questions more practical than moral or ethical. "Nature the adversary". The evolution of environmental attitudes in B.C. The minister as an arbitrator of attitudes.; CALL NUMBER: T2665:0012 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Environmental and economic issues PERIOD COVERED: 1964-1972 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-09-27 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Kiernan's efforts to curb the excesses of the "throw-away" society. The Anti-Litter Act. The recycling of derelict automobiles. Deputy Ministers of Recreation and Conservation: Dave Turner, H.G. McWilliams, Lloyd Brooks. Comments on the proposed flooding of the Skagit River Valley. Opposition by the fishing lobby. Benefits of flood control on the Fraser River. TRACK 2: Flood control on the Fraser River continued. More comments on the fishing lobby. The benefits of fish versus the benefits of hydro power and flood control. Short term as Minister of Commercial Transport, 1963-64. Minister of Travel Industry, 1967-1972. The formation of the department, 1967. Ron Worley as Deputy Minister of the Travel Industry department. British Columbia tourist promotions. Comments on "The Wonderful World of W.A.C. Bennett". Kiernan's comments on our political society. Comments on the role of socialism in B.C. B.C. still in the frontier stage. General comments on the NDP caucus prior to 1972. Analysis of the B.C. economy. The need for new hydro electric power developments in B.C.

Waldo McTavish Skillings interview

CALL NUMBER: T2705:0001 - 0005 RECORDED: [location unknown], [1980?] SUMMARY: [No content summaries or documentation available for these first five tapes.]; CALL NUMBER: T2705:0006 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Reminiscences of W.A.C. Bennett, 1941-1979 PERIOD COVERED: 1941-1975 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1980 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Waldo Skillings recalls his first impressions of W.A.C. Bennett. Comments on B.C. politics during the Coalition era. Speculation about W.A.C. Bennett. Bennett being offered a Coalition cabinet post. Pattullo and W.A.C. Bennett. Bennett's public image versus his true character. Bennett was a shy and emotional man. Bennett's weaknesses. The role of Bob Bonner in the first Social Credit government. Bonner's resignation as Attorney-General, 1968 and its effect on the government. The question of succession to the leadership of the Social Credit party after W.A.C. Bennett. Bennett wanted his son to succeed him as leader. TRACK 2: Patronage and the first Social Credit government. Public relations men and the W.A.C. Bennett government. Comments on Cam Kenmuir and Dan Ekman. Anecdote about Ekman, Kenmuir and Clancey drinking in W.A.C. Bennett's presence. Discussion of the 1972 election. Reasons for the defeat of the Social Credit government. Recollection of events during the election campaign. Comments on Phil Gaglardi. Comments about Skillings' personal fate in the 1972 election. Reaction to the defeat of the government. The effect of the defeat on W.A.C. Bennett. Comments on B.C. politics since 1972. Personal assessment of Bill Bennett as Premier. W.A.C. Bennett's last days. Anecdote about Skillings travelling to Japan as Minister of Industrial Development, Trade and Commerce and taking his bank manager with him at the bank's expense.

Gordon and Jack Gibson interview

CALL NUMBER: T2719:0001 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Gordon and Jack Gibson : the Gibson family (part 1) PERIOD COVERED: 1886-1939 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Mother's and father's personal background. Mother to Vancouver in 1886, father in 1896. Family's economic situation. Father (William F. Gibson) involved in Bridge River gold rush. Family in Yukon, 1903-05. G. Gibson born in Yukon, 1904. Family to Vancouver in 1906. Father's work history. Father a timber staker and cruiser. TRACK 2: Comments on the Vancouver real estate boom, 1912. Father; joined Forestry Corps, 1914. Odd jobs for young brothers. Father rejected for overseas service, 1915. G. Gibson goes logging with his father, 1917. Logging aircraft spruce during WW I. Building their first mill after WW I. Gibson family moves to Ahousat in early 1920s. The Gibson's on the West Coast of Vancouver Island: boats, the pilchard industry, 1925-32. Ahousat during the Depression.; CALL NUMBER: T2719:0002 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Gordon and Jack Gibson : the Gibson family (part 2) PERIOD COVERED: 1932-1952 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Description of Ahousat and the Native people. The purchase of the SS "Malahat". Anecdotes about the "Malahat". Hauling logs on the Queen Charlottes. TRACK 2: More anecdotes about the "Malahat". The end of the "Malahat". Logging airplane spruce during WW II. Dividing the work between the four brothers. Built sawmill at Tahsis after WW II. Building Tahsis. The Gibsons amalgamate with the East Asiatic Co. The Gibsons in the whaling business at Coal Harbour. CALL NUMBER: T2719:0003 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Gordon and Jack Gibson : the Sommers case (part 1) PERIOD COVERED: 1945-1960 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Continuation of the story of the Gibsons' involvement in the whaling industry. Gibsons sell out completely to the East Asiatic Company, 1952. Relations between the Gibsons and East Asiatic, 1948-52. Jack Gibson's political career: Gibson's predecessor A.W. Neill; 1945 nominating convention; Gibson MP, 1945-53; Gibson sat as an independent; comments on his communist seat-mate Fred Rose. How Gordon Gibson came to run in 1953 provincial election. G. Gibson's position before the Sloan Commission. Anecdotes about the 1953 election campaign. TRACK 2: Improper granting of FMLs under the Coalition government, 1947-52. The role of campaign funds. Discussion of the Sommers case. Gibson's resignation over the Sommers case. Gibson's defeat in 1955 by-election. Gibson feels Social Credit party involved in FML scandal. Discussion of the "money talks" speech, 1955. Sammy Craig and BCFP incident. Story of G. Gibson's address to UBC forestry class. CALL NUMBER: T2719:0004 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Gordon and Jack Gibson : the Sommers case (part 2) PERIOD COVERED: 1948-1958 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Comments on the Sloan Commission hearings. Bob Filberg of Canadian Western Forest Industries was the campaign funds "collector" for the Coalition from the forest industries. Circumstances surrounding the granting of FML #2. Why the Gibson brothers did not apply for an FML. Comments on R. Sommers' gambling. Gambling with people in the forest industry. Gordon Gibson recalls discussing FMLs with W.A.C. Bennett. H.R. MacMillan opposed to FMLs at one time. Anecdote about Gordon Gibson being ejected from the B.C. Legislature, 1955. The Lord Commission, 1955, discussed. The people involved in the hearings: Arthur Lord, Alfred Bull, T.W. Brown. TRACK 2: Ron Howard, Gibson's lawyer. G. Gibson's reaction to the findings of the Lord Commission. Comments on Bonner's role. Positive assessment; of Judge Arthur Lord. The Lillooet by-election, 1955. Anecdotes about the by-election campaign. The Gibsons' connection with David Sturdy. Discussion of Sturdy and Charles Eversfield. Meetings to discuss the Eversfield evidence with the Gibson brothers, Ron Howard, Tommy Gold, Stuart Keate and Donald Cromie. Payments to Sturdy. Comments on Sturdy's judgement. Comments on Eversfield. RCMP Inspector W.J. Butler. CALL NUMBER: T2719:0005 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Gordon and Jack Gibson : the Sommers case (part 3) PERIOD COVERED: 1953-1958 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Comments on the "money talks" speech. Discussion of the presentation of the Eversfield evidence to the Sloan Commission, Dec. 1955. The role of Charles Locke, the Sloan Commission counsel. The Gibsons have never seen the Butler Report. J. Gibson asked federal Justice Minister Stuart Garson to see the Butler Report but was refused. Discussion of the Tahsis Company in the Butler Report. The role of C.D. Orchard and the Forest Service. Davie Fulton, federal Justice Minister, put pressure on the Sommers case. Implications of Sommers case for Jack Gibson's role as a Liberal party fund-raiser. TRACK 2: Payments from Gibson to Sturdy. Peripheral involvement of James Sinclair, Johnny Fairburn and Sid Smith. Gibson has no specific knowledge of the alleged payoffs to keep Sommers out of the country. Gibson did not attend trial. Comments on the role of C.D. Scultz. Gibson did not know the Gray brothers. No ministers other than Sommers benefited personally from the bribery scheme. The Gibson brothers considered applying for an FML. Gibson cannot recall details of meeting with Sommers prior to famous speech. Miscellaneous comments. (End of interview);

Katherine (Kaye) Mylrea interview

SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Memories of the personal secretary of Premier W.A.C. Bennett, 1958-1972 PERIOD COVERED: 1933-1975 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1978-07-05 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Kaye Mylrea discusses her personal background and how she began work as a secretary for the provincial government in 1933. Working for the Comptroller-General's Office and for the Office of the Speaker. Recollection of how she came to work in the Premier's office, 1955. First impressions of W.A.C. Bennett. Description of conditions working in the Premier's office. The function and duties of the personal secretary of the Premier. The role of the executive assistant. Anecdote regarding a visit to the Premier's office by federal Minister of Justice, Pierre Elliot Trudeau. Description of the filing system used by the Premier's office. TRACK 2: W.A.C. Bennett as a letter-writer. Recollections of memorable persons who passed through the Premier's office: Haile Selassie, Viscount Montgomery. Visits to the office by Mrs. Bennett. Description of working relationship with the Premier. Assessment of the Premier's executive assistants: Ron Worley, Dan Ekman, Clarence Budd, Lawrie Wallace. The role of Gerry Bryson as Deputy Minister of Finance. The effect of the 1972 election defeat. The Premier's instructions the morning after the election defeat; packing up his files and personal effects. (End of interview)

Leo Nimsick interview : [Reimer & Petter, 1978 : part 2]

CALL NUMBER: T3224:0008 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): 1950-52 sessions and 1952 election PERIOD COVERED: 1950-1952 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1978 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Nimsick discusses: hospital insurance issue; break up of Coalition; role of W.A.C. Bennett, who advocates alternate (preferential) ballot, crosses floor; Workman's Compensation issues; more on W.A.C. Bennett; other issues in 1950-52 Parliament; caucus discipline and unity; Winch's role as Opposition Leader; storm caused by Nimsick's involvement in signing peace petition, 1951; 1952 election campaign; Social Credit League. TRACK 2: Nimsick discusses: 1952 election (cont'd); Cranbrook campaign, the story of the "great challenge" in Kimberley; candidates in Cranbrook constituency; local issues; outcome of election; Social Credit forms government; role of Tom Uphill; reaction of Harold Winch; Winch's attempt to form government, 1953.

CALL NUMBER: T3224:0009 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): 1953 election and 1952-56 sessions PERIOD COVERED: 1952-1956 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1978 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Nimsick discusses: 1952 by-elections, C.C.F. caucus, 1953, description of new members, 1953 session and Rolston Formula; comparison between Social Credit government and Coalition government; W.A.C. Bennett; hospital insurance changes under Social Credit; more on 1953 session; J. Allen Reid speech, night sittings. Impressions of: Einar Gunderson, Tilly Rolston. Discussion of events surrounding Winch's resignation as leader. TRACK 2: Nimsick discusses: more on Winch's resignation; Winch and Webster switch nominations; Webster becomes leader; 1953 election and the Rolston Formula; Nimsick speaks in Trail; Cranbrook campaign; relationship between C.C.F. and Tom Uphill; 1953-56 sessions; more on hospital insurance, liquor issue, "cow incident", Colquitz Mental Home, PGE Railway, Workman's Compensation, labour legislation, Phil Gaglardi.

CALL NUMBER: T3224:0010 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): The 1954-1956 sessions : Sommers, Doukhobors and Highways PERIOD COVERED: 1954-1970 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1978 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Nimsick discusses: Gaglardi (cont'd); Stewart-Cassiar Highway controversy (aside on Edgar Jamieson); general comments on the role of an MLA; more on Nimsick's relationship with Cominco; putting columns in newspaper; Sommers case; and 1955 redistribution. TRACK 2: Nimsick discusses: Walter Mulligan case; Bennett's financial policies; Social Credit highway program; some general comments about the Doukhobor issue and Sons of Freedom sect.

CALL NUMBER: T3224:0011 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Provincial party politics, 1955-1960 PERIOD COVERED: 1955-1960 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1978 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Nimsick discusses: the Kaiser Dam proposal; relationship between Nimsick and Bennett; internal party politics; Webster resigns as leader; leadership contest in 1956 which Nimsick runs in; caucus role in selecting leader; Strachan wins leadership; the Winnipeg Declaration; 1956 provincial election; Strachan as a leader; Wenner-Gren proposal. TRACK 2: Nimsick discusses: Wenner-Gren (cont'd;); government's entry into ferry business; labour legislation (Bill 43); civil servants' strike; homeowners grant (Strachan reverses his position under caucus pressure); 1960 election; B.C. Electric issue; Cranbrook campaign; recollections of work as an MLA (general); first impressions of Dave Barrett and other new C.C.F. MLAs.

CALL NUMBER: T3224:0012 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Formation of NDP and 1966 election PERIOD COVERED: 1960-1966 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1978 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: More on C.C.F. MLAs elected in 1960. Formation of NDP: Nimsick opposes merger with CLC. Nimsick discusses Columbia River Treaty: overview, McNaughton scheme, Libby Dam, Peace River (two river; policy). B.C. Electric take-over. Kaiser moves into East Kootenay area to mine coal: Natal-Michel relocation plan. TRACK 2: Nimsick advocates government take-over of power companies in the Kootenays, also transmission lines. Labour legislation: Bill 42. Nimsick advocates a special pension to be given to Tom Uphill. Nimsick discusses the 1963 provincial election: Fulton's role, Strachan's image, effect of Columbia River Treaty and B.C. Electric take-over, Cranbrook campaign, Bank of B.C. Also discusses: medicare (1964), Jones case, his visit to Brannon Lake juvenile detention centre, the Angus Commission redistribution. Discusses 1966 provincial election: Kootenay campaign (problem of running in an enlarged riding), style of provincial campaign.

CALL NUMBER: T3224:0013 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): The 1966 to 1969 provincial elections PERIOD COVERED: 1966-1969 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1978 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: More on style of provincial campaign (1966). Nimsick named caucus whip. He describes his role as whip. Impressions of new NDP caucus members. Controversy surrounding Gaglardi. Comments on Bonner's departure. Mediation Commission Act (Bill 33). Commonwealth Trust case. Robert's Bank superport. Cowichan Copper Company. Kootenay and Elk Railway. Incident between Nimsick and Waldo Skillings. Constituency issues. Nimsick's efforts to get a royal commission to examine the mining industry. Berger leadership challenge, 1967. TRACK 2: More on the Berger leadership challenge. Strachan resigns: 1969 leadership convention (Berger vs. Barrett vs. Williams). Nimsick attends showing of "The Good Life" with W.A.C. Bennett. 1969 provincial election: Nimsick wins on the recount. (End of interview)

Charles Ferber interview

CALL NUMBER: T3332:0001 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Financial administration of the Social Credit government, 1952-1972 (part 1) PERIOD COVERED: 1906-1972 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1978-02-18 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: C.J. Ferber discusses his background, training, and work as a chartered accountant, and his entrance into the civil service as deputy comptroller-general during the Coalition years. The 1952 election, the beginning of the Social Credit era of government, and Ferber's promotion to the position of Comptroller-General. Impressions of W.A.C. Bennett, Einar Gunderson and J.V. Fisher. Duties and functions as Comptroller-General. Responsibilities and relationship within the government. Control of government expenditure. TRACK 2: Mr. Ferber discusses the issuing of special warrants for government expenditure. W.A.C. Bennett as a financial policy-maker. The comptroller-general as financial administrator. The role, function and operation of Treasury Board. Explanation of the budgetary process during the time of W.A.C. Bennett's administration. Attitudes toward deficit-financing.;

CALL NUMBER: T3332:0002 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Financial administration of the Social Credit government, 1952-1972 (part 2) PERIOD COVERED: 1952-1972 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1978-02-18 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: C.J. Ferber discusses the subject of deficit financing in government, debt reduction and Crown Corporations. The method which the government of W.A.C. Bennett employed to eliminate the public debt of B.C. The possible dangers for governments building up large amounts of contingent liabilities. The Social Credit policy of "Pay as you go". During Ferber's years as Comptroller-General, British Columbia's public accounts were the clearest in Canada. The difference between budgetary and non-budgetary items in public accounts. [TRACK 2: blank; end of interview.];

Rev. Dermott McInnes interview

SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Recollections of W.A.C. Bennett in Edmonton during the 1920s PERIOD COVERED: 1920-1930 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1978-06-07 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Dermott McInnes recollects his involvement with a church youth group in Edmonton during the 1920s, through which he met W.A.C. Bennett. Comments on W.A.C. Bennett as a young man. Conditions in Edmonton in the 1920s. Impressions of R.J. Gillis, mentor of the youth group. TRACK 2: Further comments on the church youth group. Reaction to W.A.C. Bennett becoming Premier of British Columbia. (End of interview)

Ray Williston interview : [Young, 1965]

SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): R.G. Williston : Social Credit cabinet minister PERIOD COVERED: 1953-1965 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1965 SUMMARY: Runs for Social Credit in 1953. Did not study Social Credit monetary theory. Reasons for success of Social Credit. Social Credit League. Role of government in economic planning and control. Criticism of the Social Credit government.

Dr. Charles Ennals interview

RECORDED: [location unknown], [ca. 1965] SUMMARY: Charles Ennals first became involved with Social Credit in 1952; elected to Social Credit executive while at UBC; little study of Social Credit doctrine; differences between Social Credit and other parties; different kinds of people within the Social Credit movement; Ennals was a Socred candidate in Oak Bay, 1963; "Doctrinaire" Socreds within the Social Credit League; role of the league in political organisation; the role of governments in economic development.

William N. Chant interview : [Young, 1966]

SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): William Neelands Chant : The Social Credit monetary theory PERIOD COVERED: 1930-1966 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1966 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Little knowledge of Social Credit in B.C. compared to Alberta. The different political philosophies of the different parties. Social Credit monetary theory. The popular appeal of the Social Credit party. Assessment of the 1952 election. Comments on W.A.C. Bennett. The take-over of the B.C. Electric Company. Comments on the need for a bank with headquarters in B.C. More on monetary theory. The role of economic theory in attracting members of the Social Credit movement. The attractions of Social Credit for Chant in the 1930s. Role of the Social Credit League. TRACK 2: Further explanations of the Social Credit monetary theory and its relevance to the government of W.A.C. Bennett.

William Neelands Chant papers

Speeches; correspondence, official and personal; invitations; diverse government reports, memoranda, and briefs; correspondence, speeches, handbooks and papers concerning Social Credit Party organization and campaigns, and monetary policy. Material transferred to Map Collection, Visual Records and the BC Archives Library. During his career William Neelands Chant was a businessman, farmer, MLA (Alberta and B.C.), Minister of Agriculture (Alta.), and the Minister of Public Works (B.C.). The records include speeches; correspondence, official and personal; invitations; diverse government reports, memoranda, and briefs; correspondence, speeches, handbooks and papers concerning Social Credit Party organization and campaigns, and monetary policy. Books, photographs and maps transferred to other units. See list at the end of the finding aid. Material transferred to BC Archives Library (check library catalogue for call numbers): British Columbia. The Law Courts, Victoria, British Columbia [Leather bound copy] British Columbia. Education Building, UBC, Vancouver, B.C. Draft Canadian Constitutional Charter British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority, First Annual Report Power Means Progress. British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority Legislative Assembly of British Columbia. Standing Order (adopted February 20, 1930) Queen's Printer, 1955 H.E. Nichols, A Handbook of Social Credit, Edmonton Reading Reference to Social Credit: A Bibliography, compiled by Michael Sinclair, 1963 American Historical Documents from official Archives [portfolio] British Columbia. Centennial Edition. 1964 T.J. Irwin, The Pageantry of Parliament. [Pamphlet, no date] Major C.H. Douglas, "Social Credit Principles". Speech, 1924 Material transferred to Visual Records accession 198006-033 includes: 4 photo albums, with numerous loose photographs 4 boxes (approximately 20 slides each) 35 mm color transparencies metal plate of photo of W.N. Chant Envelope containing 11 loose photos of Chant Cuts of photos of Chant Album "To the Government of the Province of British Columbia" advertising work of Townley, Matheson & Partners, Dexter Bush and Associates Ltd., Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, architects and engineers Material transferred to Map Collection: Map. Columbia River Basin in British Columbia, showing principal water powers. Map registration number 14009B. Map. British Columbia. Electoral districts. Redistribution 1966. Duplicate of this map available. See CM/A1128. Map. Plan of part of the Municipality of Richmond, showing suggested land reclamation scheme on Sturgeon Bank. Map registration number 13829B.

Chant, William Neelands, 1895-1976

Robert Strachan personal and political papers

Series consists of personal and political material. His personal effects include correspondence with his family in Scotland and memorabilia of Strachan's boyhood (such as badges and certificates earned as a corporal in the 211st Glasgow Company of the Boys' Brigade), and family photographs. Most of Strachan's papers concern his political career, as member of the legislative assembly, and as Leader of the Opposition, and government minister.

These papers were originally arranged by topic and subject, and, as far as possible such arrangement has been maintained. Thus notes and correspondence pertaining to Strachan's constituency have been separated from papers dealing with provincial topics, such as the Columbia River power project. Similarly, papers dealing with the CCF/NDP caucus are distinct from the extensive correspondence that resulted from unrest within the New Democratic Party during the various leadership challenges of the 1960s.

H.H.C. "Torchy" Anderson interviews

RECORDED: [location unknown], 1980 SUMMARY: Oral history interviews with "Torchy" Anderson about his childhood in Victoria and Calgary, early work experience at the Calgary Herald, Bob "Eye Opener" Edwards, WW1 service, life as journalist for the Vancouver Daily Province, Social Credit governments in Alberta and B.C., Fernie, W.A.C. Bennett, and federal politics.

Lawrie Wallace interview

CALL NUMBER: T3835:0001 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Family life and early manhood PERIOD COVERED: 1913-1938 RECORDED: Victoria (B.C.), 1981-04-16 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Mr. L.J. Wallace recalls his early life at the William Head Quarantine Station, B.C. Born April 24, 1913. Siblings: Robert, Mary and Jack. Father was Chief Steward at Quarantine Station. Discussion of Wallace's forebears, mainly in the Metchosin area. Family to Victoria in 1916. Father's occupations. Father on Victoria School Board prior to death in 1938. Anecdote about great-great-grandmother, Granny Vine, of Metchosin. Genealogy of wife's (Lois Inata Leeming) family. Married 1942. Discussion of Wallace's siblings. All trained as educators. Active in First Presbyterian (later First United) Church. Church basketball in Victoria in 1920s. Victoria Normal School, 1931-32. Taught at Alberni Indian Residential School, 1933-36. Schooling: Bank Street School, George Jay School, Victoria; High School. TRACK 2: More on Victoria High School in 1920s: Ira Dilworth, Harry Smith, Bill Roper and other teachers. Wallace not a "recreational" reader. Admirer of Rev. Bruce Gray, Rev. W.G. Wilson, Prof. Walter Gage, William T. Straith, Ira Dilworth and Harry Smith. Part-time and summer jobs. Post-secondary education at Victoria College, Victoria Normal School and University of British Columbia. Graduated B.A., 1938 in history and mathematics. Master of Education from University of Washington 1946-47. Victoria College in the early 1930s. UBC, 1936-38. Member of Psi Upsilon fraternity. More on Alberni Indian Residential School.;

CALL NUMBER: T3835:0002 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Early teaching career and the Royal Canadian Navy PERIOD COVERED: ca. 1920-1946 RECORDED: Victoria (B.C.), 1981-04-16 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Mr. L.J. Wallace tells of his parents' education. Father a member of Victoria School Board. Father prominent member of Masons and Orange Lodge. Wallace graduated UBC 1938. Taught at Duncan High School, 1938-41. Involvement with co-curricular activities while at DHS. Joined Navy in 1941. Part-time training at Naden, late 1941. Officer training at Royal Roads, 1942. Active Naval Service, beginning April 1942. Married Lois Leeming, April 1942. More on Royal Roads training. Service on RCN corvette, "Ville de Quebec". TRACK 2: More about the new RCN corvette, "Ville De Quebec". Convoy duty out of Halifax, 1942. Transferred to Fairmiles submarine chasers. Caribbean duty based in Miami, 1943. On staff of King's College, Officer training school, Halifax, 1943-45. Taught navigation and "c;ommand" techniques. Commander of training ship "Charney". V-E Day in Halifax, 1945. Wallace has command of the new training ship, "New Liskeard". VJ Day in Lunenburg, N.S. Discharged from RCN in December 1945 with rank of Lieutenant Commander. University of Washington for M.Ed., starting spring 1946. Began teaching at Victoria High School, September 1946. Daughter Marilyn born 1944.;

CALL NUMBER: T3835:0003 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): World War II and teaching career PERIOD COVERED: 1940-1953 RECORDED: Victoria (B.C.), 1981-04-23 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Lawrence J. Wallace comments on the cooperative spirit displayed in Canada during World War II. Comments on Wallace's family life during the war (short track, about 5 minutes). TRACK 2: Effects of the Depression on the Wallace family. Wallace's father out of work. Comments on the C.C.F. and Social Credit during the 1930s. Wallace briefly a member of the Liberal Party during the late 1940;s. Father was president of Victoria Liberal Association. Taught at Victoria High School, 1946-53. Basketball at VHS. Founding of the Vancouver Island High School Basketball Championship (short track, about 15 minutes).;

CALL NUMBER: T3835:0004 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Teaching career and British Columbia public service PERIOD COVERED: 1946-1967 RECORDED: Victoria (B.C.), 1981-04-23 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Lawrence J. Wallace discusses his career as a teacher at Victoria High School, 1946-53. Wallace the chairman of the project to build Memorial Stadium at VHS. Assistant Director of the summer school for teachers. Unwilling to leave Victoria to become a school administrator. Joins Department of Education as Director of Community Programs Branch, October 1, 1953. Also Director of Adult Education. Wallace's appointment to the Centennial Celebrations Committee in 1955. Ray Williston and Ken Kiernan recommend a Centennial celebration for 1958. No models to follow for the 1958 Centennial. The structure of the Centennial Committee. TRACK 2: More on the structure of the 1958 Centennial Committee. The "matching grants" scheme for community projects. The scheme adopted for the Canadian Centennial in 1967 (short track, about 15 minutes).;

CALL NUMBER: T3835:0005 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): "Mr. Centennial" PERIOD COVERED: 1958-1971 RECORDED: Victoria (B.C.), 1981-05-19 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: L.J. Wallace discusses his work on the B.C. Centennial Committees for the Centennials of 1958, 1966-67 and 1971. Visit of HRH Princess Margaret in 1958. Century Sam. More on the 1958 Centenni;al celebrations. Fort Steele Historic Park. TRACK 2: Wallace's assessment of the lasting significance of the Centennial celebrations. Wallace becomes Deputy Provincial Secretary, 1959. Centennial time capsules. Comments on Hon. W.D. Black. The Royal Tours of 1959, 1966, 1967 and 1971. Story of the British Columbia flag.;
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ALL NUMBER: T3835:0006 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Deputy Provincial Secretary and Deputy to the Premier PERIOD COVERED: 1959-1977 RECORDED: Victoria (B.C.), 1981-05-21 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: L.J. Wallace describes major changes during his tenure as Deputy Provincial Secretary, 1959-1977. The British Columbia Civil Defence Program. The B.C. Civil Service Commission and the demise ;of "patronage". Wallace's various government appointments. Replaces George E.P. Jones on the Purchasing Commission, 1965. W.A.C. Bennett invites Wallace to become Deputy Premier. Wallace declines but agrees to become "Deputy to the Premier". TRACK 2: Discusses the change of government, 1972. Receives many job offers after defeat of Social Credit government, 1972. More on the 1972 change of government. Wallace asked by "every major party" to run for office. The working relationship between Wallace and W.D. Black. Wallace took cabinet oath, 1972. Wallace's relationship with cabinet. The NDP as ;a new government, 1972.;

CALL NUMBER: T3835:0007 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Deputy Provincial Secretary and Deputy to W.A.C. Bennett PERIOD COVERED: 1959-1975 RECORDED: Victoria (B.C.), 1981-07-09 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: L.J. Wallace discusses his working relations with various ministers. After hours and emergency work including tsunami at Port Alberni. Wallace appointed to Purchasing Commission, 1965. Operation of Purchasing Commission. The construction of Heritage Court as a Centennial project in 1967. Delegate to meeting of Colombo Plan, 1969. Peace Arch meeting between Prime Minister Pearson, President Johnson and Premier Bennett. Named to Order of Canada, 1971. More about the provincial elections, 1972 and 1975. TRACK 2: Speculation about W.A.C. Bennett's intentions regarding resignation. Relations between Phil Gaglardi and W.A.C. Bennett. Bennett expected to be succeeded by Leslie Peterson. Succession scenarios. Wallace encouraged to run for public office but declines. Violence incident in ;New Westminster during 1972 cabinet tour. Election night, 1972. W.A.C. Bennett as Leader of the Opposition. W.A.C. Bennett's ideas about his sons in politics. The redistribution commission of 1975.;

CALL NUMBER: T3835:0008 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Agent-General and Deputy Minister to the Premier PERIOD COVERED: 1959-1981 RECORDED: Victoria (B.C.), 1981-07-31 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: L.J. Wallace discusses his role on the Capital Improvement District Commission, 1959-77. Electoral Redistribution Commission, 1975. Change in government, December 22, 1975. Appointed Agent-General in London, 1977. Mandate as Agent-General. Made freeman of the City of London, 1978. Pays tribute to wife and family. Comments on growth of bureaucracy. Victoria High School Centennial, 1976. Becomes Deputy Minister to the Premier, 1980. As Deputy, established "Premier's Ministry". TRACK 2: Comments on his terms as deputy to W.A.C. Bennett and W.R. Bennett. The pressures on a premier. Role ;as an administrator versus policy maker. Role of "advisor". Scheduling for the Premier. Comparisons between W.A.C. Bennett and W.R. Bennett. Wallace's views of public service. Comments on attitudes in; the public service. Feels he and his brothers would have been successful in private life as well as public life. Wallace offered position in federal public service. Summary remarks. (End of interview)

W.A.C. Bennett interview : [Mitchell, 1976-1978 : part 2]

CALL NUMBER: T1675:0021 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Social Credit and economic development in British Columbia, 1952-1972 PERIOD COVERED: 1952-1972 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-06-16 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: W.A.C. Bennett discusses the administration of public finances in British Columbia during the years he served as Premier. Economic conditions in B.C. when Social Credit came to power, 1952. Anecdote about meeting an old trapper in the Peace River country. Bennett's plan for developing British Columbia. John de Wolf and reaction to the takeover of B.C. Electric. Bennett's belief in making the capitalist system work for the people. Politics as the only real science. TRACK 2: Comments on the nature of the British Columbia economy. The roles of resource industries and tourism in the economy. The lack of secondary industry in B.C. British Columbia's place in the world economy. Story about a trip to the Iron Curtain. Attitude toward the United States and the issue of continentalism in North America. Cooperation with the federal government on various projects. The Columbia River Treaty. Economic development in B.C. as a consequence of post-war prosperity. Populism. Problems associated with maintaining Social Credit's hegemony in B.C. under W.A.C. Bennett's leadership. CALL NUMBER: T1675:0022 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Financial policies of Social Credit in British Columbia, 1952-1960 PERIOD COVERED: 1952-1960 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-06-17 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: W.A.C. Bennett discusses Einar Gunderson's loss of a legislative seat, 1953, and his subsequent role in the government. Assuming the Finance portfolio. Comments on close friends and confidants during his early years as Premier. Comments on literature written on the subject of his years in power: Ron Worley's "The Wonderful World of W.A.C. Bennett", Paddy Sherman's "Bennett", Martin Robin's "Pillars of Profit", Pat McGeer's "Politics in Paradise". Political philosophy. Reduction of the public debt as the keystone of Social Credit policy during the early years of power. TRACK 2: Explanation of the process of eliminating the public debt of British Columbia. Debt reduction and its relationship to Socred development policies. Reasons for concentrating on the policy of debt reduction. Direct liabilities vs. contingent liabilities. The bond-burning ceremony at Kelowna, August 1, 1959. The development of parity bonds. The genesis of the B.C. homeowner's grant. CALL NUMBER: T1675:0023 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Government finance and transportation policies of the Socreds PERIOD COVERED: 1952-1972 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-06-18 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: W.A.C. Bennett discusses the budgetary processes of his Social Credit government. Treasury Board and "Little Treasury Board". The budget as an instrument of government policy. Balanced budget vs. deficit financing. Elimination of nuisance taxes. Political popularity vs. high principles as factors in the formulation of government policy. Budgetary growth and economic development. The advocacy of unpopular policies and the defeat of the government in 1972. TRACK 2: Plans for the expansion of the PGE Railway. The role of the railway in Bennett's plan for the development of British Columbia's north. Bennett's "Northern Vision". Oil and gas discoveries in B.C.'s Peace River District. Frank McMahon, Westcoast Transmission Company, and Bennett's efforts to build a pipeline in British Columbia. Meeting with presidents of oil companies in Victoria. Establishment of the Toll Bridges and Highway Authority, 1953. The construction and financing of highways in B.C. The background to the establishment of the B.C. Ferries Corporation. CALL NUMBER: T1675:0024 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Provincial and Federal Social Credit policies in Canada, 1952-1972 PERIOD COVERED: 1952-1972 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-08-16 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: W.A.C. Bennett discusses relations among the B.C. and Alberta Social Credit parties and the federal Social Credit party. Social Credit's ambitions in the federal field in Canada. The contest for the leadership of the federal Socreds between Robert Thompson and Real Caouette, 1961. Motivations for Manning's support of Thompson and Bennett's support for Caouette. British Columbia Socreds and their support for the federal wing of the party. The Albertan influence on the federal Socreds. Anecdote about the possibility of Ross Thatcher joining Social Credit. TRACK 2: The role of Orvis Kennedy within the Alberta Social Credit movement. Evaluation of the leadership of Solon Low. Bennett's lack of interest in becoming directly involved in federal politics after he became Premier. Anecdote about a federal Socred meeting at "The Market" in Montreal. Evaluation of Robert Thompson's leadership of the federal Social Credit party. Reasons for Thompson's failure. The effect of the Diefenbaker 'sweep' on the federal Socreds' fortunes. Reasons why Bennett supported Caouette. Anecdote about addressing a large audience in Caouette's home town of Rouyn, Quebec. Reasons for the lack of success of the Social Credit party in federal politics in Canada. CALL NUMBER: T1675:0025 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Relations with federal governments in Ottawa, 1952-1968 PERIOD COVERED: 1952-1964 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-08-16 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: W.A.C. Bennett discusses further aspects of his relationship with the federal Social Credit party in Canada. The role of the Social Credit League. The Social Credit party's influence on government policy. Federal Liberal and Conservative governments were jealous of Social Credit's achievements in British Columbia. Reasons why B.C. did not receive substantial financial aid from Ottawa during Bennett's years as Premier. Criticism of federal government's "tight money" policies. TRACK 2: Bennett's government cooperated with Ottawa on major projects. No difference in dealing with a Liberal or Conservative federal administration. Lester Pearson and the Columbia River Treaty. The B.C. government's proposal for a Bank of British Columbia. The Senate Bank Committee Hearings. Anecdote about a meeting with Paul Martin. Reasons why the original proposal for a Bank of B.C. were not successful. The present Bank of British Columbia's indebtedness to Bennett's government. CALL NUMBER: T1675:0026 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Background to the Sommers Affair PERIOD COVERED: 1930-1960 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-08-17 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: W.A.C. Bennett explains how he acquired his home in Kelowna. The purchase of his hardware store from David Leckie, 1930. Reasons why he did not seek nomination as campaign leader of the Social Credit party for the 1952 election. The background to the Sommers Affair. Bennett hired a private detective to investigate Sommers when he first heard rumours of irregularities. Reasons why Sommers had been chosen as a cabinet minister. Sommers one of the Socreds' best debaters. TRACK 2: Bennett comments on Liberal "friends" who leaked information to him. He reads from a public opinion poll commissioned by the Liberals in 1968 which rates the chances of success of several possible Liberal leaders in B.C., including John Turner. Robert Sommers' personal weaknesses. Gordon Gibson Sr.'s charges against Sommers in the legislature and the later by-election in Lillooet. Anecdote about a lively by-election campaign meeting. Bennett does not regret appointing Sommers to the cabinet. Further comments on Gordon Gibson Sr. Comments on persuading Chief Justice Sloan to become forestry advisor to the Bennett government. Evaluation of Attorney-General Bonner's handling of the Sommers case. CALL NUMBER: T1675:0027 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): The Sommers Affair PERIOD COVERED: 1956-1960 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-08-17 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: W.A.C. Bennett discusses further aspects of the Sommers Affair. Asking for Sommers' resignation from the cabinet and the appointment of new ministers. All-night sittings of the legislature. The calling of elections. The election of 1956. The effect of the Sommers Affair on the outcome of the election. Bennett's battle with the newspapers. Views on the press. Reasons for the Social Credit victory in the 1956 election. Further comments on Sommers, the court case and the Attorney-General's handling of it. TRACK 2: Reaction to the Sommers case. The impact of the Sommers Affair on the Social Credit government. Comments on possible dissension within Socred ranks. The handling of forest management licences by the Bennett government. Comments on the outcome of the Sommers case. Further comments on Robert Bonner's handling of the Sommers Affair. Loyalty as a possible weakness of W.A.C. Bennett. History will vindicate Sommers. CALL NUMBER: T1675:0028 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Federal-Provincial relations, 1952-1972 PERIOD COVERED: 1952-1972 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-10 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: W.A.C. Bennett discusses aspects of federal-provincial relations during the years he served as Premier, 1952-1972. Relations between the provinces and the federal government improved during the period. Loyalty to a united Canada. Enjoyed dealing with C.D. Howe in Ottawa. Comparison of the four Prime Ministers Bennett served in conjunction with: St. Laurent, Diefenbaker, Pearson and Trudeau. TRACK 2: Anecdote about an experience at an official dinner in Paris regarding France's relationship with Canada and Quebec. Discussion of further aspects of federal-provincial relations while serving as Premier of B.C. Response to references in the memoirs of former Prime Ministers Diefenbaker and Pearson. W.A.C. Bennett's style of politics. Comments about Pierre Trudeau's stewardship of the federal government. The incident of Trudeau referring to Bennett as "a bigot". CALL NUMBER: T1675:0029 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): The failure of the Victoria Charter, 1971 PERIOD COVERED: 1965-1972 RECORDED: [location unknown], 1977-10 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: W.A.C. Bennett discusses his attitude towards bilingualism in Canada. Review of the Canadian constitution. The background to the meeting in Victoria in June, 1971, at which the Victoria Charter was issued. Reasons for the failure to accept the charter. Quebec's lack of trust in the rest of Canada. Explanation of the formula for amending the Canadian constitution under the Victoria Charter. Individual rights versus national or regional interests as an issue in federal-provincial relations. Criticisms of a centralized federal system. [TRACK 2: blank.]

The good life

Promotional film. The economic and other benefits enjoyed by BC residents as a result of political leadership and industrial development in the province. Includes sequences on primary and secondary industries; the damming of the Columbia and Peace Rivers for hydro-electric power and flood control; expansion of highways; BC Ferries; tourism; assistance to homeowners; medical services; educational facilities; etc. Premier W.A.C. Bennett makes some brief prepared remarks at the film's beginning and end.

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