Maynard, Hannah (Hatherly)

Identity area

Type of entity

Person

Authorized form of name

Maynard, Hannah (Hatherly)

Parallel form(s) of name

Standardized form(s) of name according to other rules

Other form(s) of name

  • Mrs. R. Maynard, Hannah Hatherly

Identifiers for corporate bodies

Description area

Dates of existence

1834-1918

History

Hannah Hatherly Maynard (1834-1918) was a well-known photographer, photographic artist and business owner originally from Cornwall, England and based in Victoria, British Columbia. She ran a successful commercial studio photography business, Mrs. R. Maynard’s Photographic Gallery (1862? – 1912) in Victoria on Vancouver Island that was in operation for 50 years.

Hannah married Richard Maynard in 1852 in England and they immigrated to Bowmanville, Ontario. While in Ontario she studied photography, likely with R & H O’Hara of Bowmanville, Photographers, Booksellers, Insurance Agents, Etc. In 1862, Hannah, Richard and their family moved to the Colony of Vancouver Island on the Sierra Nevada. It is believed she opened Mrs. R. Maynard’s Photographic Gallery that same year.

As a photographer she was primarily known for her portrait photography. Throughout her career she created a documentary record of the changing landscape of Victoria and its population as it grew from a small fort settlement to an urban centre. As a portrait photographer, she created likenesses of early inhabitants among them gold miners and sailors. When the studio opened, Fort Victoria had been established by the Hudson’s Bay Company twenty year’s prior, and the Colony of Vancouver Island was barely over a decade years old. In addition, the medium of photography was in its early infancy and only several years since gold was found on the Fraser River on the mainland. During the early 1860s and 1870s, Mrs. R. Maynard’s Photographic Gallery was one of the most prolific creators of carte de visites of First Nations subjects which were popular in and around Victoria during that time, which disseminated a certain depiction of First Nations and Indigenous people to public consumers. Later on in 1897, Mrs. Maynard employed her skills in portraiture in her role as the official photographer for city police forces in Victoria for several years. Upon her retirement, Hannah is quoted in the Victoria Daily Colonist as saying “I think I can say with every confidence that we photographed everyone in the town at one time or another.”

In addition to her portrait photography, Mrs. Maynard’s portfolio of work also included other styles of photography. During the 1870s and 1880s, Hannah and Richard took several working trips together where they both practiced photography in the field. This included trips to Vancouver Island, Haida Gwaii (then referred to as the Queen Charlotte Islands) and to Banff, Alberta. In the early 1900s, Hannah Maynard supplied ethnographic documentary photographs of Indigenous people of B.C.'s Northwest Coast to the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard in the United States.

Mrs. R. Maynard was an artist, as well as a photographer. She was known for producing experimental works that involved photographic techniques such as double and multiple exposures, photo-sculptures, as well as composite and cut-and-paste montage imagery. The "Gems of British Columbia" series features portrait montages of selected children, largely Anglo-European subjects as well as a number of clients from African American and Chinese pioneer families, photographed throughout the year. These were sent as New Year's greeting cards to clients from 1881 until about 1895. In the 1880s, these composite photographs, which sometimes incorporated photo sculptures (also known as “Living Sculptures”) were published in the trade publication St. Louis Photographer (also known as St. Louis and Canadian Photographer). She also used landscape views as well as studio portraits as source material for composite works, such as the piece “80 Views on the Frazer River” featuring multiple landscape views identified as the Fraser River, or the blended “documentary” image of a field photograph depicting a view of community village scene and a studio portrait of an Indigenous women. She is also more commonly known for unique autobiographical works, tableaux vivants which employ double and multiple exposure techniques along with the techniques of photo-sculpture, and feature Hannah and other members of the Maynard family.

Over the course of her career, Mrs. R. Maynard received many acknowledgements and praise in Canada and the United States. Early in her career, the Seattle Weekly Pacific Tribune described her as a "leading photographer of Victoria” in 1878. In 1888, The New West of Winnipeg noted: “…her photographic work cannot be excelled for brilliancy of expression and harmony of effect…she is recognized as one of the foremost representatives of the profession in the country.”

During the course of her career, the personal history of Hannah Maynard and her family are closely linked, to both her photographic work and that of her studio. Her children and family are featured in many of her studio portraits, as well as in experimental works. Photographic work created by Hannah and her husband Richard have been attributed to each other in several ways and means. In 1890, Richard Maynard won first prize in the professional class for the Victoria landscape view, "The Arm" by West Shore magazine in October of 1890. This image was later also credited to Hannah Maynard in the publication the St. Louis & Canadian Photographer in November that same year.

Around 1910, Hannah Maynard appears to have disposed of her camera equipment to a photographer identified as “a Chinese photographer named Peter on Government Street”. On September 29, 1912, the Victoria Daily Colonist announced Hannah Maynard’s retirement at the age of 78 and the closure of the studio. The Mrs. R. Maynard’s Photographic Gallery appears to have never reopened. She died at age 84 in 1918 and is buried in Ross Bay Cemetery, Victoria, British Columbia. Her son Albert H. Maynard executed her will.

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Internal structures/genealogy

General context

Relationships area

Related entity

Maynard, Richard (1832-1907)

Identifier of the related entity

7505

Category of the relationship

family

Dates of the relationship

Description of relationship

Related entity

Maynard, Albert Hatherly (1857-1934)

Identifier of the related entity

17285

Category of the relationship

family

Dates of the relationship

Description of relationship

Related entity

Maynard (family) (1832-1934)

Identifier of the related entity

1697

Category of the relationship

family

Dates of the relationship

Description of relationship

Related entity

Maynard, Adelaide M. (1859-1892)

Identifier of the related entity

38380

Category of the relationship

family

Dates of the relationship

Description of relationship

Related entity

Maynard, Lillian Elizabeth (1884-1966)

Identifier of the related entity

17288

Category of the relationship

family

Dates of the relationship

Description of relationship

Related entity

Mrs. R. Maynard’s Photographic Gallery (1862-1912)

Identifier of the related entity

38374

Category of the relationship

associative

Dates of the relationship

Description of relationship

Access points area

Occupations

Control area

Authority record identifier

7503

Institution identifier

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Dates of creation, revision and deletion

Created by: KHUGHES 2012-04-19. Revised: ECURTIS 2018-06-25|ECURTIS 2019-01-24

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Sources

Maynard family research files, BC Archives. (including "West Shore Contest Oct. 1890")
Artist/Photographer files, BC Archives. (“Maynard, Hannah Hatherly”).
The Magic Box: The Eccentric Genius of Hannah Maynard Photographer 1834-1918. Canada. Claire Weissman Wilks. Toronto: Exile Editions Ltd. 1980.
Camera Workers, 1858-1950: The British Columbia, Alaska and Yukon Photographic Directory, 1858-1950. David Mattison. (“Maynard, Hannah Hatherly”)
Canadian Women Artists History Initiative . Department of Art History. Concordia University. (“MAYNARD, Hannah Hatherly” in the Artist Database).
British Columbia's City Directories 1860-1955. Vancouver Public Library. (1912, 1913).
GR-1304 Victoria Supreme Court probate/estate files. (Reel B08919, file 105, year 1918 for Hannah Maynard).
PR-0356 Newcombe family fonds (Reel A01755, box/volume 20, file 7 in MS-1077 Newcombe Family papers). BC Archives.
Framing the West: Race, Gender, and the Photographic Frontier in the Pacific Northwest. Carol J. Williams. Oxford University Press. 2003.
Images from the Likeness House. Dan Savard. Royal BC Museum. Victoria, B.C. 2010.
NANITCH: early photographs of British Columbia from the Langmann collection. University of British Columbia and Helga Pakasaar. 2016.
“A Woman’s Place”: Art and the Role of Women in the Cultural Formation of Victoria, BC, 1850s - 1920s. Karen A Finlay, Adrienne Munro and Tusa Shea. Maltwood Art Museum and Gallery. Victoria, B.C. 2004.
Rethinking Professionalism: Women and Art in Canada, 1850-1970. Kristina Huneault and Janice Anderson. McGill-Queen’s University Press. 2012. (Salahub, Jennifer. “Hannah Maynard: Crafting Professional Identity”).
Saanich Pioneer Society Archives (Albums SPA 897 and SPA 896).
Blackman, M. B. (1985). Studio Indians: Cartes de visite of Native People in British Columbia, 1862-1872. Archivaria, 21(0), 68–86.
Mattison, David. 1985. Richard Maynard: Photographer of Victoria, B.C. History of Photography History of Photography 9 (2): 109–29.
Schwartz, Joan M. (1981) The Past in Focus: Photography and British Columbia, 1858-1914. BC Studies: The British Columbian Quarterly, 0 (52): 5–15.
The Daily Colonist. Daily Colonist Newspaper Collection. University of Victoria Libraries. (September 29, 1912).

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