Newspapers--British Columbia--Victoria

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Newspapers--British Columbia--Victoria

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Newspapers--British Columbia--Victoria

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Newspapers--British Columbia--Victoria

23 Archival description results for Newspapers--British Columbia--Victoria

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Archie Wills interview : [Stursberg, 1980]

CALL NUMBER: T3570:0003 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Journalism in B.C. : interview with Archie Wills RECORDED: Vancouver (B.C.), 1980-12-09 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Archie Wills recalls his newspaper memories in an interview with Peter Stursberg. Mr. Wills discusses: his early days as an office boy at the Victoria Daily Times; becoming marine editor at age 17; William Templeton, founder of the Times; liberal nature of the Times; Benny Nichols, city editor and assistant to Templeton; joining up in World War I; publishing a newspaper while fighting in the war; re-joining the Times after the war; disagreements with Benny Nichols, the new head editor. TRACK 2: Mr. Wills discusses: getting married in 1919; becoming sports editor in the early '20s; city editor in 1927; debate over the paper's move to impartiality; anecdotes about childhood and how he got interested in journalism; anecdote about drinking; interesting characters on the old Victoria Daily Times.

CALL NUMBER: T3570:0004 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Journalism in B.C. : interview with Archie Wills RECORDED: Vancouver (B.C.), 1980-12-09 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Mr. Wills discusses: anecdote of 1935 election; 1930s as a period of evolution for newspapers; the creation of 'extras'; D-Day story; differences between newspapers 'then' and newspapers now (1930s vs. 1980s). (End of interview)

Arthur Harling Stott interview

CALL NUMBER: T3791:0001 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Journalism in B.C. : interview with Arthur Harling Stott RECORDED: Victoria (B.C.), 1980-12-10 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Mr. Stott discusses his life as a journalist in Victoria, B.C. in the mid twentieth century: starting as an office boy with the Victoria Daily Times in 1928; writing for the sports department; city hall; first assignment anecdote; stories about other newspaper men of this time -- Hal Straight, Bill Forst, Charlie Shaw, Gus Siverts; atmosphere at the Victoria Daily Times; Benny Nicholas; 'extras'; first radio broadcasting experience; Bruce Hutchison's cartoons. Mr. Stott then talks about his own personal background: born in Victoria 1909; education; diving in the 1932 Olympics in Los Angeles. TRACK 2: Mr. Stott discusses: learning to be a newspaperman on the job; changes in newspapers since he started at the Times -- now, there is more biased reporting, effects of radio; changes in the Times after Benny Nicholas' death; Max Bell's acquisition of the Times; anecdotes about Jim McKeachie, Stu Keate, Bruce Hutchison; newspaper guild; technological changes in newspapers today; family-run newspaper vs. chain-run newspaper. CALL NUMBER: T3791:0002 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Journalism in B.C. : interview with Arthur Harling Stott RECORDED: Victoria (B.C.), 1980-12-10 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Mr. Stott further discusses differences between the newspaper business in the '30s and how it is today (1980): technological advancements; no more 'extras'; competition from radio/television; biased editing/reporting. (End of interview)

Brian Tobin interview

SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Victoria High School project RECORDED: Victoria (B.C.), 1975-07-05 SUMMARY: Brian Tobin: Discussion of Victoria High School. School activities. Teachers. Ira Dilworth. Victoria College and Jeanette Caun. School friends. Travel to Europe in early and late 1930s. Work with liqu;or board. At outbreak of war, return to Canada. Job as newspaper correspondent in England during war. Was later to be sent to Japan. Told to wait a week, and then A-Bombs dropped. Work at Victoria Tim;es with Art Stott under Bruce Hutchison. 1964 became editor of Times. Accomplishments of Times Editor.;

Bruce Hutchison interview : [1 of 2]

RECORDED: Victoria (B.C.), 1975-06-17 SUMMARY: William Bruce Hutchison: First newspaper job under Benny Nicholas. Editor of Victoria High School Paper. High school teachers: Dilworth, Wood, Smith. Debating Society. Approach to writing: debaters st;ance in his various books. Influences: Chesterton, Stevenson, Emerson, Thoreau, Conrad. Politics and wilderness. Wordsworth. Romantics. Favourite book: "The Incredible Canadian". Public favourite: "Th;e Unknown Country", written in 6 weeks. Victoria Times. Western Windows. Newspaper idols: Nicholas, Dafoe, Deter, Brown, Rawlings. Writing awards. Fifty years in press. Favourite jobs: 1963, Editorial; Director of The Sun; 1950, Editor of Times -- busiest period. Victoria High School: Dilworth, Kermode, Knapton, Clyde Hall, Gilligan, WW I, influenza, S.J. Willis, 3 Smiths, school editorials, centra;lized activities in schools. Statement by Time Magazine: 'Grand Old Man', P.M. Pearson's statement. Journalism as a career. 'Just a newspaper man'.;

Bruce Hutchison interview : [2 of 2]

RECORDED: Victoria (B.C.), 1975-06-17 SUMMARY: William Bruce Hutchison: First newspaper job under Benny Nicholas. Editor of Victoria High School Paper. High school teachers: Dilworth, Wood, Smith. Debating Society. Approach to writing: debaters st;ance in his various books. Influences: Chesterton, Stevenson, Emerson, Thoreau, Conrad. Politics and wilderness. Wordsworth. Romantics. Favourite book: "The Incredible Canadian". Public favourite: "Th;e Unknown Country", written in 6 weeks. Victoria Times. Western Windows. Newspaper idols: Nicholas, Dafoe, Deter, Brown, Rawlings. Writing awards. Fifty years in press. Favourite jobs: 1963, Editorial; Director of The Sun; 1950, Editor of Times -- busiest period. Victoria High School: Dilworth, Kermode, Knapton, Clyde Hall, Gilligan, WW I, influenza, S.J. Willis, 3 Smiths, school editorials, centra;lized activities in schools. Statement by Time Magazine: 'Grand Old Man', P.M. Pearson's statement. Journalism as a career. 'Just a newspaper man'.;

Bruce Hutchison interview : [Stursberg, 1981]

CALL NUMBER: T3821:0001 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Journalism in B.C. : interview with Bruce Hutchison RECORDED: Victoria (B.C.), 1981-02-24 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Bruce Hutchison discusses his newspaper memories: starting as sports editor at the age of 17 with the Victoria Daily Times; reasons for his interest in journalism; starting with the Victoria High magazine, the Camosun; his regret at not finishing more school; anecdotes about Benny Nichols; the famous Beryl G murder case; story about a drunken police commissioner; relationship with Ken Drury; traveling to Ottawa in 1925; memories of the Provincial legislature in the early twentieth century. TRACK 2: Mr. Hutchison discusses: the concept of payola; becoming a columnist; began writing for other papers as well as the Times; doing political cartoons; his own personal political views, and the political views of the Victoria papers in the old days; getting foreign news from interviews on ships with people from the east; differences with the news now that television is so prevalent; colourful characters in the '20s and '30s- Roy Brown, Jim Butterfield, Bob Bouchette; unions; moved around to a number of different papers in B.C. in his lifetime; still with the Vancouver Sun today. CALL NUMBER: T3821:0002 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Journalism in B.C. : interview with Bruce Hutchison RECORDED: Victoria (B.C.), 1981-02-24 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Mr. Hutchison discusses the differences between newspapers in the '30s and today: better today because they are a better value, more honest, better written; more features in modern papers, but no extras; technological changes; less romance in newspaper world today; effect of newspaper guild; increase in monopolies in the newspaper business. (End of interview)

Charles Lugrin Shaw interview

CALL NUMBER: T3760:0001 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Journalism in B.C. : interview with Charles Lugrin Shaw RECORDED: West Vancouver (B.C.), 1980-09-11 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Charles Lugrin Shaw describes his life as a journalist in the early twentieth century. Mr. Shaw discusses: his grandfather, editor of the Victoria Colonist; writing war bulletins during the Great War; reporting on all sorts of different areas -- police court, city hall, parliament; details about his early life, education, father's death; impact of his grandfather on his life; strange characters at the Colonist; anecdote about Sam Matson; while at the Colonist, writing articles for Macleans, New York Times; American reporters in Victoria; moving from the Colonist to the Province; news editor at the Province through most of the '30s. TRACK 2: Mr. Shaw discusses: different editions of the Province throughout the day; 'extras' during the war years; anecdote about publisher Frank Bird; the Janet Smith case; Jack Nichol, son of owner; joining Freeman organization in 1943; more anecdotes about colourful characters at the Province during his time there. CALL NUMBER: T3760:0002 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Journalism in B.C. : interview with Charles Lugrin Shaw RECORDED: West Vancouver (B.C.), 1980-09-11 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Mr. Shaw discusses: the B.C. Institute of Journalists; flamboyant publishers, owners and editors of B.C. newspapers in the first half of the twentieth century; alcohol consumption by prominent members of the newspaper business; describes various individuals involved with journalism in B.C. at this time; differences between newspapers now and then. (End of interview)

[CHEK-TV news film -- December 1979 and January-August 1980]

Stock shots. 1. Flood scenes - houses awash, roads washed out, etc. 2. Seaspan's Santa in the Inner Harbour. 3. More floods and washouts. 4. CUPE Local 727 on strike in a flood. 5. Snowstorm - car wrecks and toboggans. 6. Small oil spill? Divers. 7. Premier Bill Bennett and unidentified woman [Bella Abzug?]. 8. More flood footage. 9. CPR train wreck. 10. Flotsam and jetsam on the beach. Clean-up. 11. Burst pipes in Chinatown. 12. Nuns demonstrating. 13. Fire - good action shots. 14. BC Hydro pickets. 15. Glenshiel Hotel - seniors demonstrating. 16. Student rally against tuition increase. 17. Demonstration in front of the Legislature. 18. Royal visit - [given the date, probably Princess Alexandra]. 19. Lambrick Park Secondary - vandalism. 20. Sooke Forest Products. 21. Reception - Prince Charles and Grace McCarthy. 22. Damaged aircraft - light planes. 23. Airport arrival [of ?]. 24. Satellite dish at Legislature. 25. Fernwood News. 26. Fire at the British Columbia Provincial Museum. 27. Village Green Inn in Duncan. Police artist sketches. 28. Airport arrival - [state visit?]. 29. "The Daily Colonist" shuts down. 1858-1980. The last issue. 30. Moving a house through city streets. Saanichton School. 31. A satellite dish or telescope [?] on the Legislature lawn.

[CHEK-TV news film -- various, #1]

Stock shots. 1. Lunar eclipse. 2. Train -- seen from the engine. 3. Hostel -- biking and back-packing. 4. Weather station. 5. Pipe organ repairs. 6. Harbour scene and architectural plans for development. [Brentwood Bay?] 7. Log booms. 8. Vehicle inspection station. 9. Beautiful British Columbia Magazine -- building, crates, foreign language issues. 10. Tall ship with four-masts. 11. Mushroom picking. 12. Rock carving -- petroglyphs. 13. "Resolution 13" to Premier W.R. Bennett. 14. Moving a piano. 15. Blessing the fleet [?]. Mass performed at the Inner Harbour. 16. Ticketing cars downtown -- upset meter man. 17. Fox Theatre -- Quadra Theatre [later the Roxy]. 18. Submarine. 19. Good Shepherd animal shelter -- animals. 20. Police and photographer in jewelry store. 21. Scenic cottage. 22. Shipyard -- dry-dock; "Adriatik"; " Pierre Radisson". 23. Submarine interiors -- H.M.S. "Conqueror". 24. Newspaper office -- "The Victorian." 25. People in historical costume -- "Princess Marguerite" [maybe inaugural run?] -- Queen Victoria, Captain Cook, etc. "Princess Marguerite" at sea. 26. Unidentified politician; Clive Jackson. 27. Letter re: "Princess Marguerite". 28. Unidentified politician. 29. Premier Bill Bennett with petition (or some other rolled-up paper).

Douglas Hunter interview

RECORDED: [location unknown], 1962-03-29 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Dr. Douglas Hunter talks about his family coming to Victoria in 1884, and his grandfather, John Robson, who was editor of the "British Columbian", "Colonist", and "Victoria Colonist", and later Premier. Dr. Hunter discusses his grandfather's life and character; his conflict with Judge Begbie; the island-versus-mainland rivalry; Richard McBride as premier; W.J. Bowser; Colonel Prior; Joe; Martin; and Thomas McInnes. TRACK 2: Dr. Hunter discusses elections in Victoria; early Victoria; the Legislative buildings; the Empress Hotel; ferries; changes in Victoria; confederation debates; s;ports; Lester Patrick; the James Bay Athletic Association, and the future of Victoria.

Elizabeth Ruggles Macdonnell interview

SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Journalism in B.C. : interview with Elizabeth Ruggles Macdonnell RECORDED: Vancouver (B.C.), 1981-01-19 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Elizabeth Ruggles Macdonnell describes her memories of the newspaper business in the inter-war years. Mrs. Macdonnell discusses her career with the Victoria Daily Times: her love of writing; family's disapproval of her work on a newspaper; growing up as a socialite; began as Ken Drury's assistant; writing for the magazine section; being one of the few reporters with some education in journalism; Nancy Hodges; her dislike of the society page; World War II; changing the society page into a report of what women were doing for the war effort; conditions at the Times; newspaper guild. TRACK 2: Mrs. Macdonnell discusses: newspaper union (cont'd); anecdote about holding hands in the park with Jim Nesbitt; interviewing Emily Carr; why she had to retire once she was pregnant. (End of interview)

Irving Strickland interview

SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Journalism in B.C. : interview with Irving Strickland RECORDED: Vancouver (B.C.), 1980-12-10 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Irving Strickland describes his 56 years with the Victoria newspaper business. Mr. Strickland discusses: starting work as an office boy at the Victoria Daily Times; using Morse Code to transmit Canadian Press stories; becoming Mr. Nicholas' secretary in 1930s; anecdotes about Benny Nicholas, a very colourful character; pay scale of those in the newspaper business at the time; Benny Nicholas' death; Nicholas' car; more Benny Nicholas anecdotes; taking photographs in the 1930s, including some of President Roosevelt's visit. TRACK 2: Mr. Strickland discusses: what happened to the newspaper after Benny Nicholas' death; joining the photography department full-time; Bruce Hutchison; changes when Max Bell bought the Daily Times. Differences between the Times under Nichol, and the Times-Colonist today: effects of union; dreadful local news in today's papers; no competition. (End of interview)

Norris family papers

Series consists of personal correspondence, business papers, letters of introduction (many to federal government cabinet ministers), testimonials, newspaper dispatches and clippings, poems, sermons, memorial cards, inspirational notes, share certificates and related documents. The records also include genealogical notes, along with correspondence between Norris family members in England, Quebec and British Columbia.

[Percival Charles Richards] : [interview]

Interview. Oral history interview with Percy C. Richards, former executive assistant to Premiers John Hart and Byron "Boss" Johnson. Richards provides character sketches of the premiers from his personal point of view. Recorded for use in the program "Portraits of the Premiers". Tape 1: Premiers Harlan C. Brewster, John Oliver, Dr. John D. MacLean, Dr. S.F. Tolmie, and T.D. Pattullo. Tape 2: Premier T.D. Pattullo. Richards was also a newsman for the Daily Colonist newspaper, assigned to the Legislative Press Gallery. Tape 3: Premier John Hart.

Percy Richards interview : [Stursberg, 1981]

CALL NUMBER: T3824:0001 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Journalism in B.C. : interview with Percy Richards RECORDED: Saanich (B.C.), 1981-02-25 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Percy Richards discusses his memories of the newspaper business between the wars: starting at the Times as an office boy; moving to the Colonist because of friction with Benny Nicholas; became an aggressive reporter who dug up his own leads; writing about the Japanese earthquake; rum-running anecdote; the Beryl G case; Benny Nicholas an alcoholic; seeing ship wrecks as shipping editor; joined the United Press Association in 1929 in San Francisco; back to Victoria in 1932 and rejoining the Colonist; memory of Sam Madson, owner of Colonist. TRACK 2: Mr. Richards discusses: salary slashes after Madson died; wishes he had done more freelancing; hospital stay due to exhaustion; journalists today spin the facts too much; too many bylines in today's papers; technological progress in newspaper business; journalism is now in a rut; establishing a free press in Ethiopia.

CALL NUMBER: T3824:0002 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Journalism in B.C. : interview with Percy Richards RECORDED: Saanich (B.C.), 1981-02-25 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Mr. Richards discusses why he was driven out of his newspaper job in Ethiopia. (End of interview)

Ronald Norris interview

RECORDED: [location unknown], 1965 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Mr. Norris discusses his grandfather's arrival in Victoria and his involvement with the Victoria Colonist newspaper. His grandfather later founded the Nanaimo Free Press Newspaper in 1874, which his family owned and operated it until 1919; he imported printing equipment and had a large printing firm, producing printed materials for the west coast. Mr.Norris talks about the coal mining industry, miners, ethnic groups, social life, the Chinese community, and the settlement of miners and their families. TRACK 2: Mr. Norris discusses the age and working conditions of the miners; schooling; Nanaimo; underwater mining; Protection Island; mining incidents; mines in the Nanaimo area; American involvement in the mining industry; United Mine Workers Union and the coal miners strike of 1913. He recalls disagreements and lawsuits between his grandfather and Robert Dunsmuir regarding newspaper editorials. Mr. Norris also recounts incidents from the strike of 1913 and the arrival of military forces.

Stuart Keate interview : [Stursberg, 1980]

CALL NUMBER: T3761:0001 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Journalism in B.C. : interview with Stu Keate RECORDED: Vancouver (B.C.), 1980-10-23 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Stu Keate describes his memories of newspapers in the inter-war period. Mr. Keate discusses: starting at the Vancouver News Herald, then moving to the Province in 1935; going to university -- rather unheard of for newspapermen in the 1930s; pride in working for the Province; getting married; personal and family background; his education at UBC; reporter at Toronto Star for a couple of years; returning to the Province as sports editor; reasons why he wanted to go into journalism; principles learned at UBC paper, the Ubyssey; first story at the Province -- a hit-and-run car accident; anecdote about the rise of features in the Province. TRACK 2: Mr. Keate discusses: relationship between CKNV and the Province; serving in the navy in public relations during WW II; going down to work for Bob Elson in the Canadian section at Time; going to Montreal as bureau chief for Time-Life; becoming publisher of the newly joined Times-Colonist in Victoria from 1950-64; publisher of Vancouver Sun from 1964-78; colourful characters at the Province and other newspapers; concentration of ownership in the newspaper business today; differences between papers then and now. CALL NUMBER: T3761:0002 SUPPLIED TITLE OF TAPE(S): Journalism in B.C. : interview with Stu Keate RECORDED: Vancouver (B.C.), 1980-10-23 SUMMARY: TRACK 1: Mr. Keate discusses: the effect of the newspaper guild on the newspaper business; effects of technological change on the newspaper business; effects of television and radio on the popularity of newspapers; newspaper production now like factory work; more foreign correspondents in today's papers; by-line situation; differences between reporters then and now. (End of interview)

Such interesting people : the journalists of British Columbia

The item is an audio recording produced for the Provincial Archives' Sound Heritage Series under contract. "We met such interesting people," say the retired journalists of British Columbia's urban newspapers. The phrase, however, could apply equally to the journalists themselves. In their own words, they describe the seemingly romantic but actually hard-working, hard-living lifestyle of the reporters, columnists, editors and publishers of the 1920s and 1930s. The voices heard are: Torchy Anderson, Bruce Hutchison, Archie Wills, Art Stott, Irving Strickland, Donald Cromie, Hal Straight, Charles Lugrin Shaw, Doris Milligan, Mamie Maloney Boggs, Pat Slattery, Aubrey Roberts, and Elizabeth Ruggles Macdonnell.

The editorial significance given to education by Victoria's leading newspapers during three periods of educational study by the British Columbia government: 1932-1936, 1942-1946, 1957-1961 / James Bruce London

The item is a microfiche copy of a thesis by James Bruce London titled "The editorial significance given to education by Victoria's leading newspapers during three periods of educational study by the British Columbia government: 1932-1936, 1942-1946, 1957-1961." 1976, xii, 270 leaves: tables. Thesis (M.A.), University of Victoria, 1976. Vita. Bibliography: leaves 263-265. Canadian theses on microfiche, 29033.

[Vic Press]

News item. Interior shots of the shared working area for staff of the Daily Colonist and Times newspapers. Footage shows a wide range of operations in advertising and other clerical departments, plus the composing room. Background sound only.